AvatarSpirit.Net
Sep 16, 2019 02:43 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
ASN Mainsite: AvatarSpirit.net
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: New Novel -The Rise of Kyoshi - June 2019  (Read 4786 times)
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 32158


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #75 on: Sep 10, 2019 09:54 pm »

Well, then, I guess our world is the darkest one of all. Cheesy
Logged

Colonel_Brian
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 4065



« Reply #76 on: Sep 10, 2019 09:56 pm »

You’re not wrong.
Logged
AtoMaki
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 5373


ENTP


« Reply #77 on: Sep 11, 2019 12:28 am »

As I was told this is a YA thing.
Logged

Keeper of Suki's firebending ancestry, the Kyoshi Warrior dojo, the love potion made from rainbows and sunsets and the mecha tanks.

My fanficions.

My Avatar RPG system.
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 32158


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #78 on: Sep 11, 2019 06:51 pm »

Well, I mean, so was Hunger Games. Now that was dark.

YA just means "the protagonist is a teenager, there aren't any six-syllable words, and all the sex is fade-to-black style." It can still be R-rated.
Logged

AtoMaki
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 5373


ENTP


« Reply #79 on: Sep 12, 2019 12:21 pm »

"the protagonist is a teenager, there aren't any six-syllable words, and all the sex is fade-to-black style." It can still be R-rated.

Apparently, YA is more like "the young poor clumsy female protagonist is the Chosen One or maybe not, the test she undertakes is really unclear, and there is an old authority man who is not-too-ambiguously evil but has a point and there is the male Fake Chosen One and the female protagonist has a crush on him and it is ironic because she is the real Chosen One, and the female protagonist has a friendly mentor guy with a dark secret he gained while working with the old authority man, and everything is pretty bleak and there is an early conflict where the female protagonist reveals her true power level and it all goes downhill from there until the female protagonist seeks out a rag-tag band of misfits she not-very-willingly joins but she warms up to them and they become besties and beat the old authority man after he becomes not-at-all-ambiguously evil"
Logged

Keeper of Suki's firebending ancestry, the Kyoshi Warrior dojo, the love potion made from rainbows and sunsets and the mecha tanks.

My fanficions.

My Avatar RPG system.
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 32158


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #80 on: Sep 12, 2019 07:41 pm »

Yeah, pretty much. I still think your "everything is pretty bleak" is wildly exaggerated, but that's all typical YA. Every one of those elements have appeared in at least one YA book before, just not necessarily assembled that way.
Logged

AtoMaki
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 5373


ENTP


« Reply #81 on: Sep 13, 2019 09:25 am »

Yeah, pretty much. I still think your "everything is pretty bleak" is wildly exaggerated, but that's all typical YA. Every one of those elements have appeared in at least one YA book before, just not necessarily assembled that way.

Good to know Cheesy. I did not read any YA novels before The Rise of Kyoshi, so this is all new for me!
Logged

Keeper of Suki's firebending ancestry, the Kyoshi Warrior dojo, the love potion made from rainbows and sunsets and the mecha tanks.

My fanficions.

My Avatar RPG system.
ViridianIV
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 1203



« Reply #82 on: Sep 14, 2019 03:27 am »


I think the book absolutely couldn't do that, because that would make the ending completely hollow given what we know Kyoshi does with Chin and advocates for Aang and Ozai. There would be no triumph, no satisfaction. Instead we would see the culmination of a Kyoshi who will be destroyed in future years and be remade into something darker and perhaps more like Jianzhu. It would position her fate as making compromise after compromise until either dying or going straight off the slippery slope- or both.

It would be like the ending of Star Wars: Phantom Menace, a celebration of a child who defeated some petty evil, who we know will one day become Darth Vader and slaughter all that is good in the universe. And the prequel trilogy is meant to be a tragedy, which I'm hoping Kyoshi's life won't be.

If this were the end of Kyoshi's entire story I might agree, but it isn't the end, just the end of the begining.  This is a series.  No one book needs to act as the fulfillment of a character's entire arc, it need only be a fulfillment of the promise of the book itself.  We don't yet know the details of Kyoshi's dealings with Chin outside of generalities either.  We know that there was a standoff, that Kyoshi said 'stop', that Chin said 'no' so she cut the land in half and he fell to his death.  Kyoshi accepting her responsibility in his death as essentially the same as killing him doesn't necessarily invoke intent or a choice to do so, merely that she takes responsibility for the outcome.  Without further information we may only speculate (at this juncture) as to the degree of intent she held for Chin's death.

Yun sort of shows up at the end of the book out of absolutely nowhere, without any lead up or foreshadowing, to drive the story and take it away from Kyoshi a little bit.  If we want to keep to analogies of bad Star Wars movies, its like when Darth Vader appears in Rogue One for only the second time at the very end to steal the climax of the movie from the people it was supposed to be about.

Quote
I definitely prefer that Kyoshi was left unfulfilled and without answers. Happy endings that affirm life-honoring ideals are nice, but Kyoshi's story could never be that. Leave those to Aang.

But I'm not even advocating for a happy ending here, nor that I'm at all dissatisfied with the book even, just that my own innate sense of narrative structure nitpicked that the ending was a tad anticlimactic for throwing in a 9th inning swerve instead of paying off the books primary narrative thread... I mean I'm not saying my idea above was the ONLY way.  I'd have also preferred Kyoshi straight killed Jianshu herself over what we got, just so long as it was KYOSHI driving the ending of the story rather than a twist that had no foreshadowing.

Fair to note we don't know what this is all leading to either, its full well this could better inform sequels and provide a better overall 'series arc'... I simply think that the novel taken as it is, on its own, to be its best self Kyoshi should have been the driving force of the climax.
« Last Edit: Sep 14, 2019 03:33 am by ViridianIV » Logged

"In the time before the Avatar, we bent not the elements, but the energy within ourselves."
                  -Lion Turtle dropping the mic
AtoMaki
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 5373


ENTP


« Reply #83 on: Sep 14, 2019 05:04 am »

Yun sort of shows up at the end of the book out of absolutely nowhere, without any lead up or foreshadowing

Ah, the book does set up Yun it is just very subtle because it is woven into another arc: Kyoshi's training with Lao Ge. When they talk about how killing a person has consequences they in fact foreshadow the consequence for the only murder of real importance in the book so far: Jianzhu killing Yun. Yun showing up at the end was a great way to drive the point through in my opinion without undermining the consistency talk between Kyoshi and Lao Ge earlier.

Really, the true victorious ending for Kyoshi is saving the governor kid. The rest of the book is just a very-very long conclusion.
Logged

Keeper of Suki's firebending ancestry, the Kyoshi Warrior dojo, the love potion made from rainbows and sunsets and the mecha tanks.

My fanficions.

My Avatar RPG system.
ViridianIV
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 1203



« Reply #84 on: Sep 14, 2019 01:06 pm »


Ah, the book does set up Yun it is just very subtle because it is woven into another arc: Kyoshi's training with Lao Ge. When they talk about how killing a person has consequences they in fact foreshadow the consequence for the only murder of real importance in the book so far: Jianzhu killing Yun. Yun showing up at the end was a great way to drive the point through in my opinion without undermining the consistency talk between Kyoshi and Lao Ge earlier.

Really, the true victorious ending for Kyoshi is saving the governor kid. The rest of the book is just a very-very long conclusion.

Not to be TOO dismissive of Lao Ge's philosophies, but I believe that the thing Lao Ge most foreshadows is why Kyoshi is going to eventually live to be 230 instead of dying at a natural age more than a hundred years earlier than that xD...

Anyway I don't take that as foreshadowing.  It might retroactively serve as an explanation IF that's in fact what Lao Ge's function is supposed to be... but I hold that since we are never provided any sort of indicator that ANYTHING like Yun's miraculous ability to turn up alive and evil is even possible it's an anti-climax.  Even a simple scene of Kyoshi or Jianshu noticing a hooded man who seemed to be watching them half a book earlier and then moving on would have been enough to indicate SOMEONE was there... (A little lazy of course, but ANY foreshadowing is better than NO foreshadowing).

When it comes to plot twists I have a very simple barometer as to how successful I feel it is.  If nobody can figure it out before it happens it is a failure.  A plot twist hast to be something woven into the tapestry of your work, and must be something that could theoretically be deduced WITHOUT taking a wild guess by those of keen observation.  A twist should be protected by misdirection and careful writing NOT by omitting it entirely until the moment of the reveal.  The Yun twist can't be worked out beyond a wild guess because nothing in the rest of the book even indicates that he (or anything else of plot significance for that matter) is there.
« Last Edit: Sep 14, 2019 01:30 pm by ViridianIV » Logged

"In the time before the Avatar, we bent not the elements, but the energy within ourselves."
                  -Lion Turtle dropping the mic
AtoMaki
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 5373


ENTP


« Reply #85 on: Sep 14, 2019 01:23 pm »

but I hold that since we are never provided any sort of indicator that ANYTHING like Yun's miraculous ability to turn up alive and evil is even possible it's an anti-climax.

It is supposed to be a massive "WTF?" moment to underline Lao Ge's point. Obviously, any direct foreshadowing would have cheapened it in my opinion. You can piece it together if you watch very closely because the correlations are pretty straightforward. 
Logged

Keeper of Suki's firebending ancestry, the Kyoshi Warrior dojo, the love potion made from rainbows and sunsets and the mecha tanks.

My fanficions.

My Avatar RPG system.
ViridianIV
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 1203



« Reply #86 on: Sep 14, 2019 01:50 pm »

It is supposed to be a massive "WTF?" moment to underline Lao Ge's point. Obviously, any direct foreshadowing would have cheapened it in my opinion. You can piece it together if you watch very closely because the correlations are pretty straightforward.  

Preceding this post again with the fact that I really like this book overall so that nobody thinks my nitpick here is more impactful than it is since I'm writing so much about it here in conversation.  I LOVED this book, Kyoshi's done well.  I think we're in good overall hands as to the future of the series.

But a Twist is a slippery slope of a narrative tool.  There HAS to be foreshadowing to make a twist impactful.  Anyone can write a WTF twist with their hands tied behind their backs if that isn't true.  Its the difference between 'Bruce Willis was dead the whole time!' and 'IT WAS GLOBAL WARMING SURPRISE!!!' (to use two examples from the same director)

Partially this is my 'old school' narrative design philosophy I admit, I don't like MOST stories being put out this day and age because IMO most 'stories' being put out today AREN'T STORIES.  A Story needs a defined structure and some kind of message or purpose.  TWISTS are dangerous tools in the narrative toolbox because they are one of the things that can most easily reduce a STORY into just 'A-Bunch-of-Events-that-Occur-in-Sequence-for-Spectacle-but-don't-Actually-Mean-or-Say-Anything' and can rob a tale of its underlying throughline.  Stories need a REASON, especially FICTION, because unless the idea is to satirize the eleven o'clock news, random events happening without a rhyme or reason aren't worth putting the effort into writing about.  There's a reason 'trilogies' and 'the heroes journey' keep being retold over and over in different ways, it's because they are structured and they say something that resonates with the human psyche.  While on the other hand there's a reason all this 'subverting your expectations' stuff is so dogmatically argued about and disappoints so many people, it's because human beings don't appreciate when stories FAIL to be structured or when they appear to be meaningless.  We don't like having our time wasted.

Betrayal of narrative structure is pretty common this day and age under that guise of 'subverting expectations'.  Its a BAD habit that is super popular in writers right now most primarily because writing a good story is actually very hard and most people writing today are doing it for a paycheck and not necessarily because they actually have anything they mean to express in the work.  THIS book in particular spends a lot of time being a straight out revenge quest in spirit, not saying revenge had to play out for that underlying through-line to be adequately paid off, just that a surprise monster turning up to do the deed at the end acts mildly to cheapen the structure of THIS book more than it helps it ESPECIALLY since Kyoshi doesn't appear to be more or less averse to doing it herself... she's not conflicted or desiring a means to escape having to do it, nor does she seem anylonger intent that he should die... and so there isn't even something for her to contemplate by being angry or relieved to have her revenge stolen... it just sort of comes out of left field and provides nothing more than a 'to be continued' to stamp at the end, which we already could easily take care of with the Kurick reveal anyway.  It could very well be this bit was necessary for the series AS A WHOLE and that Yun's appearance here will retroactively seem right for 'the Kyoshi saga'... but it still mildly hurts this book as a standalone experience because it doesn't feel like Kyoshi was driving the conclusion of her own story...... and of course, all in my own very humble opinion.
« Last Edit: Sep 15, 2019 12:35 pm by ViridianIV » Logged

"In the time before the Avatar, we bent not the elements, but the energy within ourselves."
                  -Lion Turtle dropping the mic
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 32158


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #87 on: Sep 15, 2019 07:59 pm »

If this were the end of Kyoshi's entire story I might agree, but it isn't the end, just the end of the begining.  This is a series.  No one book needs to act as the fulfillment of a character's entire arc, it need only be a fulfillment of the promise of the book itself.

Um, no. It doesn't matter if this is a series. A book that has no full arc isn't a book; it's the first N chapters of a story that for some reason was sold separately. Even television episodes try to give their characters a complete journey.

Thankfully, F.C. Yee wrote a book.


We don't yet know the details of Kyoshi's dealings with Chin outside of generalities either.  We know that there was a standoff, that Kyoshi said 'stop', that Chin said 'no' so she cut the land in half and he fell to his death.  Kyoshi accepting her responsibility in his death as essentially the same as killing him doesn't necessarily invoke intent or a choice to do so, merely that she takes responsibility for the outcome.  Without further information we may only speculate (at this juncture) as to the degree of intent she held for Chin's death.

We have Kyoshi's own words of what happened. You're kind of reaching, here. We totally know what went down.


If we want to keep to analogies of bad Star Wars movies, its like when Darth Vader appears in Rogue One for only the second time at the very end to steal the climax of the movie from the people it was supposed to be about.

Cheesy That's a pretty wild misreading of the movie. Rogue One could have ended with Jyn and Cassian's deaths; that's the end of the story. The climax is when they shoot Krennic and press the Win button on the satellite.

Vader's scene is an epilogue that connects the movie more fully to the main story that we all already know, and provides a little illustration of the themes of the story in a single scene.


Not to be TOO dismissive of Lao Ge's philosophies, but I believe that the thing Lao Ge most foreshadows is why Kyoshi is going to eventually live to be 230 instead of dying at a natural age more than a hundred years earlier than that xD...

BWAH?!?!?!?!?!?

Um, yeah, it's obviously alluding to Kyoshi's long life (although whether it ends up being the explanation is up in the air), but Lao Ge's discussions with Kyoshi are the thematic backbone of her character arc.


When it comes to plot twists I have a very simple barometer as to how successful I feel it is.  If nobody can figure it out before it happens it is a failure.

So the entire Sherlock Holmes canon is a series of unrelenting failures? Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

I never cease to be amazed how differently people experience stories.


There's a reason 'trilogies' and 'the heroes journey' keep being retold over and over in different ways, it's because they are structured and they say something that resonates with the human psyche.

Meh. The "hero's journey" is, amongst modern academic circles, considered to be racist garbage. The reason it keeps getting reused is because George Lucas used it to give some literary legitimacy to his big successful Pop Art movie, and Hollywood executives who have no idea what storytelling is demanded that all their blockbusters at least give lip-service to it so that they can believe success can be engineered independently of vision. If you look at the number of failed movies and stories that slavishly adhere to the Hero's Journey, but yet completely fail as a story, you'll see that the journey itself doesn't really resonate in any way. It's garbage that doesn't even speak to the narrow set of experiences it claims to represent, never mind something fundamental to humanity.

As for trilogies, they're popular because Lord of the Rings and Star Wars were both hugely popular, even though LotR is actually six books that were simply published as three and Star Wars was going to be 12 episodes before George Lucas burnt out and decided to cash out while there was still some public goodwill. Again, people ape those things without examining what they're aping or why it was used in the original work.


THIS book in particular spends a lot of time being a straight out revenge quest in spirit, not saying revenge had to play out for that underlying through-line to be adequately paid off

It totally doesn't. All the time Kyoshi spends planning her revenge, she's given reasons to question whether that's the right path, and then there's the whole thing with the corrupt governor she spares that shows that Death as a solution/punishment isn't always the correct choice, another bit of foreshadowing that you seemed to have glossed over.

I think you need to do a deeper examination of the events of the book. A lot of what you probably dismissed as filler has great significance to the story being told, and yes, a full complete story was being told (even if there are sequel hooks).
Logged

ViridianIV
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 1203



« Reply #88 on: Sep 15, 2019 09:07 pm »

Um, no. It doesn't matter if this is a series. A book that has no full arc isn't a book; it's the first N chapters of a story that for some reason was sold separately. Even television episodes try to give their characters a complete journey.

Thankfully, F.C. Yee wrote a book.

I've acknowledged this in several places already but I think it came after the post you're quoting from.  I don't disagree with you as to the nature of a single book.  Part of the reason for my nitpick here afterall is EXACTLY because the twist seems to come to me at the expense of the book itself... just as part of the reason its JUST a nitpick is because its ALSO a series.  Stories within a series need to be mindful of BOTH individual arcs and the serials arc concurrently... so not every 'serial' story thread needs to be wrapped up within the contents of one of the books within the series, but occasionally sacrifices get made from one to benefit the other.


Quote

We have Kyoshi's own words of what happened. You're kind of reaching, here. We totally know what went down.

I disagree.  We have it in Kyoshi's own words that she does not consider his death any different than if she'd killed him herself, NOT that she necessarily intended to kill him.  To be VERY clear I don't think she is incapable of intending to kill him or something?  I'm not reaching for a defense of her character or anything if that's what you're inferring from me, I simply don't like to make to many inferences about internal motivations of external consequences of a story that may yet be further elaborated on to keep them from acting as an 'expectation' that can be disappointed... and can only offer what I BELIEVE may have been the intentions... but that usually requires more knowledge of a characters personality than we have of that iteration of Kyoshi.  She's not even really the Kyoshi we've been reading about quite yet so I as yet wouldn't feel comfortable trying to guess at what I  believe she actually intended to happen in that moment vs what did happen.


Quote
Cheesy That's a pretty wild misreading of the movie. Rogue One could have ended with Jyn and Cassian's deaths; that's the end of the story. The climax is when they shoot Krennic and press the Win button on the satellite.

Vader's scene is an epilogue that connects the movie more fully to the main story that we all already know, and provides a little illustration of the themes of the story in a single scene.

We don't NEED an epilogue that connects the movie more fully to the main story because we ALREADY know it.  AS an epilogue it's not only unnecessary, but also injects A New Hope's opening with a fresh paint of chuckleworthy wonkyness when a man Vader chokes to death tries to convince Vader that they are a diplomatic vessel when he knows full well that Vader has DIRECTLY chased the plans to their ship from from the site of a battle... SO here we are, our 'story' has ended and the heroes have all sacrificed themselves... so sad, moment of silence.... Now everybody cheer cause here's your favorite child murdering psychopath killing more people and isn't it AWESOME!?  We didn't need it, its only there because it was more profitable to the mouse for the old DV to have his due.  If we HAD to have it, it should have come BEFORE the primary characters fade to black.  Nothing was stopping Vader from chasing Leah from the battle a sequence or two ahead of the death star's attack.... would of been a great sequence though if all the characters had survived to that point and THEY were the rebels dying to hold Vader back one inch at a time passing the plans forward... but even that wouldn't have saved the fact that the characters themselves were about as interesting as watching cardboard dry so... eh?  Don't let me hold you back from liking the film though if you do.  I actually prefer SOLO to it and acknowledge that Solo isn't really any GOOD.  What can you really do with Star Wars these days?  I'm actually more excited to see FROZEN 2 this winter... and I didn't even like the first one that much xD.
 
Quote
BWAH?!?!?!?!?!?

Um, yeah, it's obviously alluding to Kyoshi's long life (although whether it ends up being the explanation is up in the air), but Lao Ge's discussions with Kyoshi are the thematic backbone of her character arc.

I DID say 'not to be to dismissive' xD but I'll acknowledge that this is about as 'clearly' relatable to Kyoshi's long life as her actions in Chins death are clearly relatable to intent and therefore by my own expressed philosophies on narrative I'll do my best not to just assume its absolute validity or anything especially as this almost certainly will be elaborated on in future stories. Lao Ge's philosophical importance in pertaining to Kyoshi's revenge quest I suppose is another conversation.  If that counts as foreshadowing for Yun for somebody, I envy your interpretation, to me it doesn't count.  Philosophy is a many headed hydra, easy to make inferences of that can be valid or invalid from different perspectives, sometimes you can decently foreshadow a physical result with philosophic foreshadowing, but I certainly don't consider anything Ge said to be strong enough anything to account for Yun's presence at the end of the story, but if YOU can, more power to you.


Quote
So the entire Sherlock Holmes canon is a series of unrelenting failures? Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

I never cease to be amazed how differently people experience stories.

Wouldn't know, haven't read any of the Holmes books, but if attempts at capturing them in other medium are anything to go by, aren't they generally twists built on by Sherlock's keen observation of the elements of the story that are already there?  If he's just inventing solutions out of thin air though, than yes that's definitively in the 'deus ex machina' category and IMO bad twist design.

Quote
Meh. The "hero's journey" is, amongst modern academic circles, considered to be racist garbage. The reason it keeps getting reused is because George Lucas used it to give some literary legitimacy to his big successful Pop Art movie, and Hollywood executives who have no idea what storytelling is demanded that all their blockbusters at least give lip-service to it so that they can believe success can be engineered independently of vision. If you look at the number of failed movies and stories that slavishly adhere to the Hero's Journey, but yet completely fail as a story, you'll see that the journey itself doesn't really resonate in any way. It's garbage that doesn't even speak to the narrow set of experiences it claims to represent, never mind something fundamental to humanity.

Uh wow... I mean I'm not saying anybody has to love The Hero's Journey or anything, and it was only an example of one popular storytelling archetype as a standing for ALL archetypes but... that's a pretty bleakly specific opinion on an archetype that is pretty wide ranging... I don't see how ANY story archtype can be 'racist' as a concept unless one specifically writes it to be... not all hero's journey's have to be about the white man rescuing slaves, thats a whoooole other issue and one that has little to do with the heroes journey as a narrative outline.  Our happy Avatar TLA itself is a pretty egregious example of the Hero's journey afterall is it not?

Quote
As for trilogies, they're popular because Lord of the Rings and Star Wars were both hugely popular, even though LotR is actually six books that were simply published as three and Star Wars was going to be 12 episodes before George Lucas burnt out and decided to cash out while there was still some public goodwill. Again, people ape those things without examining what they're aping or why it was used in the original work.

These things didn't invent trilogies they just used them... and LotR was six books that got reformatted into three because trilogies are more popular than... what would it even be called... sextologies?  Certain patterns mesh with the human condition, I'm not saying the number of works in a series are as imporant as story archtypes of course... but long standing patterns tend to be as much a product of psychology as they are sociology... (not discounting the latter at all)


Quote
It totally doesn't. All the time Kyoshi spends planning her revenge, she's given reasons to question whether that's the right path, and then there's the whole thing with the corrupt governor she spares that shows that Death as a solution/punishment isn't always the correct choice, another bit of foreshadowing that you seemed to have glossed over.

I think you need to do a deeper examination of the events of the book. A lot of what you probably dismissed as filler has great significance to the story being told, and yes, a full complete story was being told (even if there are sequel hooks).

I fail to see why this changes it from being a revenge story for a decent portion of its running time?  Revenge stories aren't normally Tarantino's straight line... if anything they are normally about how nearly impossible it is for one to undertake a revenge quest and have it be at the end what it was in the beginning.  Lots of revenge stories end with people giving up their revenges?  In fact revenge stories where the protagonist is continually confronted with the enormity, irony, and/or folly of their quest and how that changes their path are fairly bog standard?  I'm not saying I think Kyoshi absolutely should have killed him, I'm not saying Kyoshi absolutely should have spared him.  In the case of THIS book in particular I'm not even saying the story should have stringently adhered to a single story archetype even (accepting that its easy to conflate my arguments above about narrative structure in general with my thoughts about this book itself of which my ONLY quibble is the Yun twist) I'm simply saying that I think the story should have been being driven more by Kyoshi in the conclusion than by a Spirit Zombie Yun card with 'Flash'.  She recaptures the driving force of the story after when she manages to keep the house altogether with what she'd learned from Lao Ge... but it doesn't change that in the pivotal moment of the climax of Kyoshi's novel Yun is the driving force OUT OF THE BLUE and it doesn't even really amount to much in the confines of THIS book.  I personally consider that a mistake (acknowledging that as the rest of the SERIES is yet to be written, I may feel differently about the placement of this for the series arc as a whole.)  A minor personal quibble in an otherwise great book.

I think you're being vaguely condescending here though so I'll leave it at that without questioning your own ability to examine narrative... but respectfully ask you do the same.

Edit: Jesus this is really long... sorry.
« Last Edit: Sep 15, 2019 10:21 pm by ViridianIV » Logged

"In the time before the Avatar, we bent not the elements, but the energy within ourselves."
                  -Lion Turtle dropping the mic
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines LLC
MySQL | PHP | XHTML | CSS