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Question: Your opinion on the best and worst Avatar comics.
The best is The Promise - 0 (0%)
The best is The Search - 4 (26.7%)
The best is The Rift - 6 (40%)
The best is Smoke and Shadow - 1 (6.7%)
The worst is The Promise - 1 (6.7%)
The worst is The Search - 0 (0%)
The worst is The Rift - 1 (6.7%)
The worst is Smoke and Shadow - 2 (13.3%)
Total Voters: 15

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Author Topic: Your opinion on the best and worst Avatar comics.  (Read 2571 times)
Loopy
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« Reply #50 on: Sep 18, 2016 06:58 pm »

We know that Aang never really decided who is he first, Aang or the Avatar. Thats the beauty of the cover of season 3. However he said that he accept to be flawed Avatar, who cares about his values and family more than the 'world sake', but later we see that he never made a clear desicion.

Um, where was this ever a theme or plotline in the cartoon? This sounds like Aang's subplot from the live action movie. The cartoon never said that Avatars had to pick between families and duty, and Aang valued life over killing Ozai because he saw his Avatar duties in a different way than everyone else- and then Aang's worldview was validated in the end. People can disagree with the idea, but the cartoon very clearly resolved the matter of Aang's values and he mastered the Avatar State because of that.


Zuko is the same- these conflicts never ends.
But sure, they could add some more aspects

I don't expect the conflicts to end, but the characters very clearly conquered the previous manifestations of them in the cartoon. The conflicts should be expressed in new ways in order to honor the previous growth, or else the character's regression should be the focus of the story.
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doratchi
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« Reply #51 on: Sep 19, 2016 03:37 am »

We know that Aang never really decided who is he first, Aang or the Avatar. Thats the beauty of the cover of season 3. However he said that he accept to be flawed Avatar, who cares about his values and family more than the 'world sake', but later we see that he never made a clear desicion.

Um, where was this ever a theme or plotline in the cartoon? This sounds like Aang's subplot from the live action movie. The cartoon never said that Avatars had to pick between families and duty, and Aang valued life over killing Ozai because he saw his Avatar duties in a different way than everyone else- and then Aang's worldview was validated in the end. People can disagree with the idea, but the cartoon very clearly resolved the matter of Aang's values and he mastered the Avatar State because of that.


Zuko is the same- these conflicts never ends.
But sure, they could add some more aspects

I don't expect the conflicts to end, but the characters very clearly conquered the previous manifestations of them in the cartoon. The conflicts should be expressed in new ways in order to honor the previous growth, or else the character's regression should be the focus of the story.
They never said family or duties and that wasn't my point but if your'e asking he choose Katara over the avatar state, he got when Appa gone or when someone from team avatar is in trouble...and you should read again the Promise part 3 or just take a look on Korra season 2
But that wasn't wasn't my point


The conflicts are expressed in new ways, not to mention the great new conflict over progression and traditions
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Loopy
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« Reply #52 on: Sep 19, 2016 05:33 pm »

They never said family or duties and that wasn't my point but if your'e asking he choose Katara over the avatar state, he got when Appa gone or when someone from team avatar is in trouble...and you should read again the Promise part 3 or just take a look on Korra season 2
But that wasn't wasn't my point

But what I'm saying is that the original cartoon came down on the side that Aang was right to leave his training to go to Katara. The Avatar is not meant to be a prequel-trilogy Jedi (and a lot of people miss that the Jedi Order was doing things all wrong, hence why Palpatine was able to put them in a no-win situation with the Clone Wars and lure Anakin away from them, and they were wiped out by the Wrath of God so that the Jedi could be reborn in Luke). The previous Avatars were all shown as flawed, and one of the messages of the series as a whole was showing that every generation has to deal with the results of the mistakes of the previous generation. So mastering the Avatar State has nothing to do with 'choosing an identity.' The Guru showed one path to self-mastery, and Aang found another. Both are equally valid, but Aang had to go with what worked for him, or else the Avatar State would have overcome him, as it did when he was conflicted over killing Ozai. He masters it when he is at peace with himself.

So The Promise is wrong and bad, is what I'm saying. Aang goes back to thoughts of execution in a poorly set-up scenario, and his lack of control of the Avatar State seems tied to anger more than anything. The Promise gets the whole thing wrong on multiple levels for the sake of trying to mimic the plot beats of the cartoon. It's a kid copying its parent without any understanding of the mechanics behind each action.

As for Korra, she didn't really mastered the Avatar State by Book Spirits. Aang kind of gave her a shortcut that had nothing to do with self-mastery, which I would say is not a valid method of getting control of the Avatar State. And since Korra wound up breaking the Avatar State, I think the storytelling is on my side with that.


The conflicts are expressed in new ways, not to mention the great new conflict over progression and traditions

I guess we've reached the point where I go "No" and you go "Yes" and I go "No" and you go "Yes" and we end up in an infinite loop. If you'd care to elaborate how these conflicts are manifesting in new ways, I'd be willing to continue with this line of discussion.

The conflict about progression versus tradition is indeed new, hence why I think The Rift is one of the better comics. It's too bad the execution was so ham-handed.
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doratchi
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« Reply #53 on: Sep 20, 2016 04:27 am »

1. Aang didn't found another path, until he got hit from that rock. And the cartoon leaves the question open, it shows us 2 sides. He struggeled with his own Avatar state, and still fighting with himself in The Promise, and only Katara can calm him down. But at the end he didn't kill Zuko just like what happend in season 3.
About what I said on Korra, I was meaning for Aang's children, who feels like he didn't give them the right attention.
2. You are right about the message, I can't see how its connected to The Promise.
Sure it's like a childish version of season 3, but the 2 others are still great. Smoke and Shadow is horrible, but that's for another time
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Loopy
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« Reply #54 on: Sep 20, 2016 05:45 pm »

1. Aang didn't found another path, until he got hit from that rock. And the cartoon leaves the question open, it shows us 2 sides. He struggeled with his own Avatar state, and still fighting with himself in The Promise, and only Katara can calm him down. But at the end he didn't kill Zuko just like what happend in season 3.

I think you're getting the whole Avatar State stuff confused. There were two issues Aang was dealing with- the physical damage from Azula's lightning strike that prevented him from going into the Avatar State at all; and the mental/spiritual issues that prevented him from controlling the Avatar State once he was able to get into. The rock restored the physical side, but he didn't have the ability to control it. That's why he was fighting so savagely and was remaining in the Avatar State instead of just blinking in and out to get the power boost without the vulnerability like Roku and Kyoshi demonstrated.

Aang only got the ability to blink in and out after he decided to spare Ozai's life. That's the point where he achieved mastery over the Avatar State, demonstrating that he had achieved maturity, which was the basis of his whole character arc as demonstrated by Katara starting every episode by saying, "...he has a lot to learn before he's ready to save anyone. But I believe Aang can save the world."

You should watch the finale again. It's good stuff.


About what I said on Korra, I was meaning for Aang's children, who feels like he didn't give them the right attention.

Ah, gotcha. But that has nothing to do with the Avatar State or being the Avatar. That was supposedly about Aang favoring Tenzin for being an Airbender.
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doratchi
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« Reply #55 on: Sep 21, 2016 02:34 am »

I know, that's just what I said, it's not a contradiction.

Actually I kind of forgot what we were talking about  Grin
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Loopy
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« Reply #56 on: Sep 21, 2016 09:01 pm »

Well, I was positing that Aang masters the Avatar State in the cartoon finale and the comics regress that without explanation. Do you agree with that, now?
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doratchi
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« Reply #57 on: Sep 21, 2016 10:10 pm »

Well, I was positing that Aang masters the Avatar State in the cartoon finale and the comics regress that without explanation. Do you agree with that, now?
Ah what
He wasn't, he just got out of it at the last second (probaly what he learned in the air tempels was stronger than the avatar state)
We actually see him controlling the avatar state at every comics (only 2 times he gotten into it amotionally, like old times).
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Loopy
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« Reply #58 on: Sep 22, 2016 05:34 pm »

He wasn't, he just got out of it at the last second (probaly what he learned in the air tempels was stronger than the avatar state)

I disagree, because it was established in the incident at the North Pole that the Avatar State had committed violence that troubled Aang, and pretty much had to have killed Fire Nation soldiers while destroying the fleet. If Aang's ideals were that powerful, they would have worked there, first.

Also, that's why I mentioned all that stuff about character arcs and Aang's maturity and the Avatar State coming from mastery of the self. It all ties in to the presentation. Plot points in stories happen for a reason, and it makes little sense to make the moment about some unimportant Air Nomad ideals that hadn't even been mentioned in the series before Zuko joined the group. The only reason the conflict was there was to bring Aang's lack of self-mastery into prominence, and give him a conflict with both his friends and the previous Avatars, making him have to rely on himself.

Plus, there's this part:






This is what mastery of the Avatar State looks like: a brief glow to access a burst of power, followed by immediately leaving it to minimize the danger of being killed while in the State while also keeping complete control of one's actions. Aang was able to do this in a calm moment, after Ozai was already defeated, for no more urgent purpose than putting out some forest fires that weren't threatening him.

That was the point where Aang demonstrated that he had matured, that he had mastered the Avatar State, that he had completed the journey he began at the beginning of the story.

You should watch the cartoon's finale again, it's really great. Smiley


We actually see him controlling the avatar state at every comics (only 2 times he gotten into it amotionally, like old times).

That's just it; we haven't! We've never seen Aang's eyes glow briefly, followed by a controlled application of his increased power. Thus, the Avatar State has either been controlling or influencing whenever he's tried to use it, and he's been acting recklessly by endangering the entire Avatar Spirit! If it's his choice to use the Avatar State this way, then he's even less mature than in the cartoon, because at least there he had little or no control about when the Avatar State activated.

And if Aang's less mature, everything else is secondary, because his character has regressed so badly it's outright character-assassination.
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doratchi
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« Reply #59 on: Sep 23, 2016 03:39 am »

Oh I forgot about that part, you are right. Sorry.

In the comics, Aang were able to get into the avatar state whenever he wanted, plus he saved Zuko in the end.
Katara warned him not to enter into the avatar state in emotional way to make the right desicion. That means he can control it. After he got calm in that rock, he entered the avatar state and separated between the armies, and saved Zuko. That means he can still be calm and controll himself.
But in the Rift Part 3, he was able to controll himself until he saw the spirit attacking and shooted it down.
Believe me, if Aang was less mature, Basco's animao instict should feel it.

So I guess we both can be happy now.
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Red Hawk
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« Reply #60 on: Sep 23, 2016 05:28 pm »

I have a couple cents to contribute about Aang's use of the Avatar State in the comics.  I've talked about this before with Loopy, I think, but in any case, here's my take.

The scene at the end of "Sozin's Comet" is meant to show that Aang has mastered the Avatar State, I agree -- to a point.  It's never explicitly stated that Aang has absolute and total control of the Avatar State and nothing could ever go wrong when Aang uses the Avatar State after that.  And he attained control in a different way than Guru Pathik taught him, so what Guru Pathik said about controlling the Avatar State doesn't necessarily apply.  To say that Aang "mastered" the Avatar State and suggest that any problems Aang ran into with the Avatar State runs contrary to the end of Sozin's Comet reminds me of this bit from an interview ASN did with Sifu Kisu back in the day:

"Mastery is an illusive concept. Once you claim the title "Master" you are not one. Why? Because you stopped learning by thinking you have arrived somewhere."

Basically, saying you have "mastered" something does not mean there are no flaws in how you use it, or that there no improvements that you can yet make.  I don't think it's contradictory that Aang's emotions can still influence the Avatar State and cause him to risk losing control, as seen in The Promise Part 1.  Just because Aang is capable of control doesn't mean he will always be in control.

I disagree strongly when Loopy says we haven't seen Aang control the Avatar State in the comics.  He has.  There are examples in The Promise Part 3 and The Rift Part 3.  Yes, Aang appeared to use the AS with his eyes glowing continuously rather than a short burst.  So?  When was it stated that only short bursts can be done when using the Avatar State?  It's self-evident that Aang was clearly in control when using the Avatar State at several points in the comics.  Heck, in The Promise Part 3, he goes into the Avatar State right directly after rejecting Roku's guidance and "severing" himself from Roku.  The point is that he is acting out of his own will, not the past Avatars!  So yeah, this distinction that Loopy is trying to make is not really substantiated by the cartoon, just speculation that is pretty directly contradicted by the comics.
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Loopy
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« Reply #61 on: Sep 23, 2016 05:46 pm »

Well, that's the thing that really gets me. We had something clearly established in the cartoon, but it wasn't actually in dialogue, with a character saying, "Yo, here's the exact rules of this special mechanic. No I said 4d6 for damage, not 6d4, pay attention, 007!"

And so the subsequent media - written by someone not involved in the original production, with 'supervision' and "Story by" credit from the showrunners that later amounted to one of them confessing that he'd never had any involvement with the comic production whatsoever beyond looking at a few art samples and reblogging advertisements - depicts things differently. Now, if this were in the service to new stories, with Aang discovering the limits of his mastery (perhaps the thoughts of the past Avatars influence him more subtly now, or the level of power he needs to access is in direct proportion to how "in control" he needs to be, etc), I'd be willing to cut the change in depiction some slack.

However, this is not what's happening.

When Aang is upset, the Avatar State lashes out at who he's upset with. That's the "control" you two are trying to argue in favor of. It's not anything that's uniquely Aang, or reflects any level of control.

And that's exactly what we got in the cartoon. The Avatar State activated when Aang was in life-threatening danger or upset. We're rehashing the same thing over again, not exploring anything enabled by changes to Aang in the finale.

And on top of that, is there anywhere in the comic where the story acknowledges that Aang has control sometimes? Some sign of where he uses the Avatar State in a clear frame of mind to do something non-violent? Some bit of dialogue where it's hinted that Aang is discovering the limits of his control, or expected there to be more control, or even acknowledging that he hasn't been able to do the same thing he did after beating Ozai?

Nowhere.

It's all just rehashing the cartoon, outright ignoring character developments to copy, copy, copy, copy. (Or rip-off, whatever you want to call it.) Aang gets upset, he glows, he launches powerful frontal attacks. Aang gets afraid, he glows, he launches powerful frontal attacks. Aang's in life-threatening danger, he glows, he launches powerful frontal attacks.

The only element of the comics bringing any willingness to acknowledge Aang's control is you, the well-disposed readers who want to interpret things in the comics' favor. What does that say about the actual content of the stories being told?
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Red Hawk
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« Reply #62 on: Sep 24, 2016 12:31 am »

Well I disagree with that premise that what you're claiming about the Avatar State was "clearly established in the cartoon" to begin with.  I really don't think it was.  That's your interpretation, but there's nothing really substantial behind that interpretation.  You're not getting mad at the comics being inconsistent with the cartoon, you're getting mad about the comics being inconsistent with your interpretation of the cartoon.  Which is fine, if you dislike the direction that the comics went in, more power to you.  I think there's a distinction between that and calling it flat-out inconsistent and "character assassination".

Also, you're simply misconstruing Aang's use of the Avatar State in the comics. Creating the chasm around Yu Dao for the purpose of separating the Fire Nation and Earth Kingdom armies was more than "launching a powerful frontal attack" (as was saving Zuko specifically from falling to his death).  Creating a rock golem so he could physically go toe-to-toe with Old Iron was more than "launching a powerful frontal attack" (he did eventually use a "frontal attack" against Old Iron, sure, but so what?  Is that somehow mutually exclusive with being in control?).  I think it's self-evident that Aang is in control in those situations, and that's not a matter of "wanting to interpret things in the comics' favor".    Where's any indication that he's not in control? Or rather, that he loses control when he goes into the Avatar State.  In fact, the statement Katara makes in The Promise Part 1, that if he goes into the Avatar State when he's so upset he'll lose control, implies that Aang would be in control of the Avatar State under normal circumstances.
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doratchi
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« Reply #63 on: Sep 24, 2016 12:09 pm »

I have a couple cents to contribute about Aang's use of the Avatar State in the comics.  I've talked about this before with Loopy, I think, but in any case, here's my take.

The scene at the end of "Sozin's Comet" is meant to show that Aang has mastered the Avatar State, I agree -- to a point.  It's never explicitly stated that Aang has absolute and total control of the Avatar State and nothing could ever go wrong when Aang uses the Avatar State after that.  And he attained control in a different way than Guru Pathik taught him, so what Guru Pathik said about controlling the Avatar State doesn't necessarily apply.  To say that Aang "mastered" the Avatar State and suggest that any problems Aang ran into with the Avatar State runs contrary to the end of Sozin's Comet reminds me of this bit from an interview ASN did with Sifu Kisu back in the day:

"Mastery is an illusive concept. Once you claim the title "Master" you are not one. Why? Because you stopped learning by thinking you have arrived somewhere."

Basically, saying you have "mastered" something does not mean there are no flaws in how you use it, or that there no improvements that you can yet make.  I don't think it's contradictory that Aang's emotions can still influence the Avatar State and cause him to risk losing control, as seen in The Promise Part 1.  Just because Aang is capable of control doesn't mean he will always be in control.

I disagree strongly when Loopy says we haven't seen Aang control the Avatar State in the comics.  He has.  There are examples in The Promise Part 3 and The Rift Part 3.  Yes, Aang appeared to use the AS with his eyes glowing continuously rather than a short burst.  So?  When was it stated that only short bursts can be done when using the Avatar State?  It's self-evident that Aang was clearly in control when using the Avatar State at several points in the comics.  Heck, in The Promise Part 3, he goes into the Avatar State right directly after rejecting Roku's guidance and "severing" himself from Roku.  The point is that he is acting out of his own will, not the past Avatars!  So yeah, this distinction that Loopy is trying to make is not really substantiated by the cartoon, just speculation that is pretty directly contradicted by the comics.
Word up
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« Reply #64 on: Sep 24, 2016 12:42 pm »

I offer that perhaps the artists thought that having aang's eyes only briefly glow wouldn't be understood as well as in the cartoon.

what i mean to say is, maybe in this different medium, the artist couldn't figure out a way to show aang having mastery of the avatar state without keeping him glowing the entire time. does that break the established canon? yes. but maybe they felt it was a necessary compromise.

personally, I don't agree with the idea, but its a possibility. strong one at that.
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« Reply #65 on: Sep 27, 2016 06:19 pm »

Well I disagree with that premise that what you're claiming about the Avatar State was "clearly established in the cartoon" to begin with.  I really don't think it was.  That's your interpretation, but there's nothing really substantial behind that interpretation.  You're not getting mad at the comics being inconsistent with the cartoon, you're getting mad about the comics being inconsistent with your interpretation of the cartoon.  Which is fine, if you dislike the direction that the comics went in, more power to you.  I think there's a distinction between that and calling it flat-out inconsistent and "character assassination".

So what was the point of showing that? Tell me your interpretation of the creator intent behind that sequence of portrayals.

Because every aspect of storytelling, both visuals and dialogue, is someone's choice, and you've been very silent on what the original cartoon was doing aside from not committing so that a later comic can come along and arbitrarily do things differently.


Also, you're simply misconstruing Aang's use of the Avatar State in the comics. Creating the chasm around Yu Dao for the purpose of separating the Fire Nation and Earth Kingdom armies was more than "launching a powerful frontal attack" (as was saving Zuko specifically from falling to his death).  Creating a rock golem so he could physically go toe-to-toe with Old Iron was more than "launching a powerful frontal attack" (he did eventually use a "frontal attack" against Old Iron, sure, but so what?  Is that somehow mutually exclusive with being in control?).  I think it's self-evident that Aang is in control in those situations, and that's not a matter of "wanting to interpret things in the comics' favor".    Where's any indication that he's not in control? Or rather, that he loses control when he goes into the Avatar State.  In fact, the statement Katara makes in The Promise Part 1, that if he goes into the Avatar State when he's so upset he'll lose control, implies that Aang would be in control of the Avatar State under normal circumstances.

I don't see those as any different than raising a dust-storm to kill Sandbenders or creating Koizilla to smash navy ships.

And Katara's "implication" is simply stating the ideal of how the Avatar State is supposed to work, not that it's unusual for Aang to be doing it at this point. Which is the entire problem.




I offer that perhaps the artists thought that having aang's eyes only briefly glow wouldn't be understood as well as in the cartoon.

what i mean to say is, maybe in this different medium, the artist couldn't figure out a way to show aang having mastery of the avatar state without keeping him glowing the entire time. does that break the established canon? yes. but maybe they felt it was a necessary compromise.

personally, I don't agree with the idea, but its a possibility. strong one at that.

It's possible, but then we're just stacking errors on top of errors, that they can't juggle panels properly at the same time they're portraying the Avatar State incorrectly.
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« Reply #66 on: Sep 28, 2016 10:19 am »

So what was the point of showing that? Tell me your interpretation of the creator intent behind that sequence of portrayals.

Because every aspect of storytelling, both visuals and dialogue, is someone's choice, and you've been very silent on what the original cartoon was doing aside from not committing so that a later comic can come along and arbitrarily do things differently.

No, I haven't been silent.  In my first post I agreed that the sequence was meant to show that Aang had mastered the Avatar State, I just disagree on the definition of "mastery" you seem to be going with.  And I don't think that the fact that it was with just a flash "clearly establishes" that control of the Avatar State can only be done with a flash.  It's not my job to explain why that is, the burden of proof would be on you to show that it's the case.

Quote
I don't see those as any different than raising a dust-storm to kill Sandbenders or creating Koizilla to smash navy ships.

You don't see the difference between haphazardly lashing out to hurt people he was angry at and using a specific technique to separate two forces to prevent anyone from getting hurt? And you don't see the difference between an outside entity (La) basically taking control of Aang to wreak havoc as opposed to coming up with a specific technique to match an opponent?  I'm not sure what to say to that other than that seems like willful ignorance, to me.  Moreover, you kind of just moved the goalposts from what you said initially.  The point remains that Aang's behavior when using the Avatar State in the comics has not boiled down to "launching powerful frontal attacks".

Quote
And Katara's "implication" is simply stating the ideal of how the Avatar State is supposed to work, not that it's unusual for Aang to be doing it at this point. Which is the entire problem.

"Aang! Stop! If you enter the Avatar State in such an emotional way, you won't be able to control yourself!"

It's a statement about Aang's behavior with regards to the Avatar State specifically.  The implication is there.  If it wasn't unusual for Aang to lose control like you're suggesting, Katara wouldn't have added the "in such an emotional way".  It would just be "If you enter the Avatar State, you won't be able to control yourself!"
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« Reply #67 on: Sep 28, 2016 02:00 pm »


But what I'm saying is that the original cartoon came down on the side that Aang was right to leave his training to go to Katara.
I found that part pretty strange because of a lack of communication and specification is why Aang left. Maybe if the Guru had told Aang that "Hey, your past three lives had loves too. I'm not saying let go of Katara completely. Just learn how to do so in order to make better use of the Avatar State." "How" I have no idea, but the past three Avatars managed.

Even then, I felt that Iroh praising Aang for not learnging to control the Avatar State was pretty strange too. Sure perfection and power can be overrated, but sometimes power is what you need to beat an opponent. Especially if it's their world's version of a force of nature that can level at least and city block radius. Aang requiring the Avatar State to subdue Ozai at all just further invalidates him a bit.
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« Reply #68 on: Sep 29, 2016 06:44 pm »

No, I haven't been silent.  In my first post I agreed that the sequence was meant to show that Aang had mastered the Avatar State, I just disagree on the definition of "mastery" you seem to be going with.  And I don't think that the fact that it was with just a flash "clearly establishes" that control of the Avatar State can only be done with a flash.  It's not my job to explain why that is, the burden of proof would be on you to show that it's the case.

Dude, we're not playing for points here. No one else cares about this debate, except for the people with pre-determined opinions who are rooting for one of us or the other. And we're certainly not going to convince each other, not the fourth or fifth time having this debate. Forget "burden of proof." Calm down. Have a conversation. Or don't. If you're playing for points, this isn't going to go anywhere and we may as well stop before one of us goes off the rails.

I'm asking you why all the Avatars were always shown with the 'blink glow.' Not just the sequence with Aang, there. Why was a visual distinction always made between Aang's upset continuous glow versus the Avatars who had mastered the state? And I don't want an answer on the meta level, either. The storytellers chose to put the 'blink glow' in the story, and I want to know what it means within the story.


You don't see the difference between haphazardly lashing out to hurt people he was angry at and using a specific technique to separate two forces to prevent anyone from getting hurt?

Not when the city wasn't even danger, no. Not when it nearly killed Zuko through careless use, no.

The only people trying to get into the city were Smellerbee and company, and that move had nothing to do with them. It was just Aang lashing out and visualizing his new decision to favor the city over the Earth and Fire nations.


And you don't see the difference between an outside entity (La) basically taking control of Aang to wreak havoc as opposed to coming up with a specific technique to match an opponent?  I'm not sure what to say to that other than that seems like willful ignorance, to me.  Moreover, you kind of just moved the goalposts from what you said initially.  The point remains that Aang's behavior when using the Avatar State in the comics has not boiled down to "launching powerful frontal attacks".

The goalposts are in the same spot when I consider making a pointless puppet for a giant kaiju battle a launched "powerful front attack." Grin

It's all just Aang lashing out, with no thought or strategy.

La gave Aang the power with Koizilla, but Aang was definitely the one controlling everything, modeling the limb movements.


"Aang! Stop! If you enter the Avatar State in such an emotional way, you won't be able to control yourself!"

It's a statement about Aang's behavior with regards to the Avatar State specifically.  The implication is there.  If it wasn't unusual for Aang to lose control like you're suggesting, Katara wouldn't have added the "in such an emotional way".  It would just be "If you enter the Avatar State, you won't be able to control yourself!"

I don't see how it implies anything about Aang at all. It's making a distinction between the two known ways of entering the Avatar State. If it's referencing anything about Aang's past, it could easily be a callback to the Book Earth finale, where Katara saw Aang enter the Avatar State willingly, but I don't think anyone is under the impression that Aang had mastered the Avatar State at that point.
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