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Author Topic: So, where exactly did Aang and Katara live for the 40 something years inbetween  (Read 3514 times)
ThePeacefulGuru
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« Reply #25 on: Feb 18, 2016 10:20 pm »

The only thing I question though is why after Tenzin had his children that she would remain in the South Pole instead of moving to be closer to her grandchildren. That was one of the missteps I felt the writers did with Katara, not having her play a bigger part in their lives.


I agree on that, Katara seems like the kind of person who would be a super-involved mother and grandmother and considering that both her sons are Mama's boys even as adults and she and Kya are obviously close there's a good deal of evidence for that so I really don't know why she wouldn't have returned as soon as Jinora was born.

The one explanation I can see as to why she wouldn't would be if the tribe was somehow in desperation for her healing abilities but since Water Benders don't seem to be an endangered species in the Southern Tribe anymore that would take a pretty big event which you would think would've been worth noting and even that raises the question of why on Earth she wouldn't have moved once whatever that was, was over
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Loopy
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« Reply #26 on: Feb 19, 2016 07:26 pm »

What if Republic City has too many bad memories for her?
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ThePeacefulGuru
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« Reply #27 on: Feb 19, 2016 09:22 pm »

hm...I think that, that might be the case for a while but again, I think if that were the only reason she'd have returned as soon as Jinora was born
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kevo998
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Katara: "bend over aang! *wicked smirk*


« Reply #28 on: May 16, 2016 04:53 pm »

Katara and Aang were just too cool for the swinging cats of republic city, I know that's why she didn't get a statue like Aang Yyess I could see it now...
 
Katara: "Naa I'm just too cool for that sweetie"

And I'm sorry Aang & Katara were together till his death. Even Gene was saying when he writes the comic with the much awaited time jump He'll be focusing on their happy relationship on their later lives.

But hey if ya'll want the split so bad, fanfiction would be a cool place to start XD   
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ByStorm
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« Reply #29 on: May 28, 2016 05:56 pm »

^That and basically moving her to cameo appearances that made her useless entirely. What happened to having old people being amazing?

I honestly can't see Katara being in the kitchen, more like a Waterbending master that passes her techniques to the next generation that has a prominent role in her community, if in the South or the RC.
Oh, I don't think that the creators intended there to be a Kataang divorce when they wrote LoK.

Just like they didn't intend Toph to be alive when they wrote Book Air.

All I'm doing is proposing a theory that explains some oddities and plot holes that probably come from the creative team having a blind spot for any female character who can't supply fanservice. If anyone can explain the same things- including Katara being stuck in the South Pole alone and isolated despite supposedly having spent most of her life near RC- in an elegant way, then I'm more than willing to consider it.

All I'm hearing, though, is "Katara stayed in the kitchen," which is to me just as OOC as her breaking up with Aang. And her staying in the kitchen doesn't explain why Kya had to abandon her own life to keep Mom company after Dad died, when Dad would have presumably died near RC and Tenzin already lives there.

They either need to retcon the TV series, or do a reboot, because I cannot envision the current creative team being able to do anything but run the franchise to the ground based on the comics and Korra.
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Nausicaa
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« Reply #30 on: May 28, 2016 06:44 pm »

hm...I think that, that might be the case for a while but again, I think if that were the only reason she'd have returned as soon as Jinora was born

In retrospect, I have the horrible feeling that the only reason they didn't show Katara at the ceremony was because it would raise questions about why Korra would have to go to the South Pole in Book 4. It'd make more sense for Katara to stay at the island, at least for a while. She could be closer to her children and grandchildren. (Including attending Jinora's ceremony, and seeing Bumi airbend) She could help heal Korra there. She could see the development of the new airbenders.

The show never really suggested that Katara was doing anything particularly important in the South, and her on-screen reasons for staying there are gone by the end of Book 2. She doesn't have to watch over Korra's training anymore, because Korra left for Republic City. She doesn't have to stay there for Kya's sake, because Kya's hanging out with her siblings.

If they'd established that Sokka's family lived there, or that she had a lot of friends there or something, it'd be a bit more understandable. Or if Katara was involved in the Tribe's politics. But as it is, it just feels weirdly distant.

So I can't help but wonder if she was left out for the sake of plot convenience- if Katara doesn't travel to RC, then it's going to seem less weird that Korra has to go to the Southern Water Tribe to be healed by her. (Though, I also get the impression they just forgot about her)
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« Reply #31 on: May 30, 2016 05:33 pm »

You know, that's very plausible. However, if true, I don't think the justification for shipping Korra down south would be that bad; she wants to get away from the stress of the city and be with her parents, and Katara comes down to help when Korra is ready to start her therapy.
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Nausicaa
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« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2016 11:17 pm »

Yeah, that's true.

------

In terms of where Aang and Katara lived as adults... personally, I'd assume that they'd be pretty nomadic, but have a couple of permanent homes around the place (one in the Southern Water Tribe, one on Air Temple island, plus probably some nice guest rooms in the FN and EK capitals). 
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Uzuko
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« Reply #33 on: May 31, 2016 05:16 am »

In terms of where Aang and Katara lived as adults... personally, I'd assume that they'd be pretty nomadic, but have a couple of permanent homes around the place (one in the Southern Water Tribe, one on Air Temple island, plus probably some nice guest rooms in the FN and EK capitals).  

I can't see Aang and Katara maintaining a residence Ba Sing Se. I imagine the Dai Li wouldn't have risen again if Aang was spending any significant time there.  

Why wasn't Aang's own spirituality a flaw in this series? His tendency to put it above everything else would explain so many issues in Korra's era.


Hm...
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ahintoflime
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« Reply #34 on: May 31, 2016 08:19 am »

In terms of where Aang and Katara lived as adults... personally, I'd assume that they'd be pretty nomadic, but have a couple of permanent homes around the place (one in the Southern Water Tribe, one on Air Temple island, plus probably some nice guest rooms in the FN and EK capitals). 

I can't see Aang and Katara maintaining a residence Ba Sing Se. I imagine the Dai Li wouldn't have risen again if Aang was spending any significant time there. 

Why wasn't Aang's own spirituality a flaw in this series? His tendency to put it above everything else would explain so many issues in Korra's era.


Hm...

It's not so much the Dai Lee rising again as it is them once again forgetting their purpose, again. You do not protect the cultural heritage of your nation by wanting a war with another nation that isn't doing anything to you.

Aang had already said "okay" to everyone wanting to live with each other and also so he could be with Katara. His spirituality wasn't Roku's and apparently past ideas of staying separate.
His spirituality was in line with the antagonists: Amon and his wanting everyone to be equal, Unalaq and his give spirits a chance, and Zaheer and his fight for your own ideals. Well aside from their own hypocrisy once the plot reared its ugly head.

The issues in Korra stem from no one speaking to one another or acting spiritual in the first place or thinking about their own hypocrisy.
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« Reply #35 on: May 31, 2016 08:56 am »

I did not say that Aang selfishness in putting his spirituality above duty was a component of legend of Korra. I said Aang spiritual selfishness should have been a theme/flaw of Aang in Legend of Korra.
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AtoMaki
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« Reply #36 on: May 31, 2016 09:39 am »

I did not say that Aang selfishness in putting his spirituality above duty was a component of legend of Korra. I said Aang spiritual selfishness should have been a theme/flaw of Aang in Legend of Korra.

It kinda was, even if the show didn't really make a big deal out of it. The whole Yakone (and thus Amon) scenario tied back to Aang trying to do an Ozai again and not succeeding. With hindsight, him giving back Korra her bending didn't make much service either. Then we have Tenzin who was made defunct by Aang and his views, while Kya and Bumi went haywire with impunity asa side effect. 
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« Reply #37 on: May 31, 2016 05:58 pm »

We see the detrius of what we can only assume is Aang's behavior, but I feel like the storytelling failed to actually connect most of what you're listing to Aang's character or actual actions, so I'm skeptical that it was intended by the storytellers.

Of course, I don't think Aang's spirituality is this isolated thing- like a hat or invisible friend or whatever- that can be elevated above other considerations. If someone is actually spiritual, that spirituality is supposed to inform every action they take and every decision they make. If someone can set aside spirituality to do something, then they're not spiritual, they're a poser.

What AtLA presented was everyone around Aang not sharing his specific spirituality, and so trying to undermine his moral code. Aang was made to doubt his own spirituality, hence why he considered doing something outside his moral code, but the resolution to the plot is that Aang is too spiritual to let those doubts overcome him at the critical moment.

I feel like a lot of the controversy about AtLA's ending comes from the over-glorification of anti-heroes. Whether the message of AtLA's ending is good or not, a lot of the arguments I see against it seem a lot like the the more superficial anti-hero comic books I've read.
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ByStorm
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« Reply #38 on: May 31, 2016 08:45 pm »

We see the detrius of what we can only assume is Aang's behavior, but I feel like the storytelling failed to actually connect most of what you're listing to Aang's character or actual actions, so I'm skeptical that it was intended by the storytellers.

Of course, I don't think Aang's spirituality is this isolated thing- like a hat or invisible friend or whatever- that can be elevated above other considerations. If someone is actually spiritual, that spirituality is supposed to inform every action they take and every decision they make. If someone can set aside spirituality to do something, then they're not spiritual, they're a poser.

What AtLA presented was everyone around Aang not sharing his specific spirituality, and so trying to undermine his moral code. Aang was made to doubt his own spirituality, hence why he considered doing something outside his moral code, but the resolution to the plot is that Aang is too spiritual to let those doubts overcome him at the critical moment.

I feel like a lot of the controversy about AtLA's ending comes from the over-glorification of anti-heroes. Whether the message of AtLA's ending is good or not, a lot of the arguments I see against it seem a lot like the the more superficial anti-hero comic books I've read.

Here's how I believe these types may have wanted it to end. If Aang killed Ozai, he would remain broken and eventually, would become the last Airbender. After they celebrate at the Jasmine Dragon, Aang begins feeling really whoozy. His stomach's aching and he looks sick. Katara knows something is wrong and the rest do as well. but they expected Aang would be elated. evne happy that the threat of the world was finally put to rest. Everyone but Zuko and Iroh does not notice this. Iroh notices Aang's wariness and aoffers for him to stay in his room to rest.

The wear and anguish on Aang's face grows a bit more evident, as if the entire event itself had caused him to age by at least five years alone. Aang accepts, and once he is upstairs, looks at the room. There were no windows, no open spot for which air could escape. In his wary mind, it was almost perfect. Aang's mind went back to Gyatso,all of the monks he had abandoned a century ago to extermination. He thought to himself, what's worth my life if I've forsaken my people's beliefs? I killed a person. No one down there understands this at all It's like they're...

..."barbarians." He bitterly told himself. He spat on the floor and rubbed his lips to get the stench of Katara's lips off his face. He couldn't look her in the eye any longer. Toph? He despised her. Zuko? He tried to kidnap him several times and is the descendant of a mass murderer. Iroh wasn't any better. His flying bison and lemur Momo were with caretakers of the higer ring. They'd be much better there anyways. Aang's mind diverts to an act that he read about in scrolls when he just became the Avatar. As he recalled, they were a way to end a monk's life by himself in the quickest and arbitrarily, the least painful. It was the vacuum technique. He attempted to do so one night before Gyatso discovered his attempt,taking away the scrolls to have them burned. Aang remembered how Gyatso yelled at him, before he hugged and embraced the equivalent of his son in his arms.

Tears went down his eyes at this memory, and many others flowed.

"I have failed you, Gyatso."

He began to form an air vacuum ball in his hands right until he moved it around his head. The Avatar State almsot began to kick in, but Aang repressed it. Every single moment of it. He was tired of being a failure, a traitor to his own people. How his own friends pushed and pushed him to the grievous act of killing another human being. He hated them. He was done with it all.

At the next moment? It was darkness. Aan'g body collapsed on the floor while the wind itself, his final act of bending blew open Iroh's door. Zuko knew something was off and walked upstairs.

Katara's eyes widened and immediately their hearts stopped beating for a moment. Gazing at Aang's lifeless eyes. Zuko shook his body, telling him to breath, and to please not be dead. He kept shaking his dead body, tears falling down his face, until relaization had kicked in and he hugged his body. Katara and the others soon followed, and witnessed the dead body of their friend. Their Avatar. Her lover. Katara looked at him and immediately extended her arms and fashioned an ice blade. She wasn't going to live without him. Hermind wondered why he ended his own life, but once her mind fell into the truth, she lost her concentration and fell to the ground weeping. Iroh was terrified, and looked at the boy Avatar. He could only remember his own son's death clearly, and for the last of his kind to die, he felt even more responsible. Sokka couldn't even speak and just walked outside, and Suki followed him.

Aang was truly the one to end the War. He learned all the elements. The last of his entire civilization.

Weeks after the funeral, Katara threw up. It was discoveredshe had morning sickness. She was pregnant. Her brother and their friends looked at her, but while she could remain happy, she couldn't help but weep. After one of them said that the child might be an Airbender, she walked out and left them for good. Katara gave birth to her son in the woods with a friend she met. Within time, she moved to the Southern Air Temple and meditated within its ruins and with help form others cleaned it up and buried the bones of the fallen in respect. Katara often wished he might be an Airbender. Perhaps there would be hope for that race of people. She gave up her own life to dedicate herself to Aang's culture, but once in a while ,would curse him for abandoning them. This is why she kept mum on who her son's father was, because otherwise, she wouldn't be able to continue during the day. Her son looked too mcuh like Aang. He had his eyes, but looked like his grandfather and looked like a mix of Southern Water Tribe and Air Nomad. Soon, followers flocked to the Temple to follow these ways, and the son became the teacher, and the leader. He found out who his father was, but for that day, the only thing he could do was cry. He didn't want to be like him. He didn't want to be a coward. His mother set him straight, and he wouldn't talk to his uncle ever again.

The other Avatar was already born. She was from the same tribe as his mother and in explring the world, did the elements. She soon came at the doors of the Air Temple while the boy looked at her. Her name was Korra, the new Avatar. He was Tenzin.

And he hugged her. Korra kind of understood why, but let him embrace her. He was the last of his kind, and she was outcast of her village. Somehow, Tenzin could feel his father through her, and it gave him thepeace he needed.

And then an Equalist shoots him in the head, and pulls off his mask. It is Deadpool.

His lifeless body laid on the ground, and no more airbenders existed. "Chimichangas." Chimichangas ,indeed.

----
Or insert anti hero.

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« Reply #39 on: May 31, 2016 08:55 pm »

And then we remember that Gyatso killed when the shiola hit the fan.....

Clearly Air Nomads are willing to kill if things get that bad. I still think that no kill rue was just brought in to add in more conflict.
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« Reply #40 on: Jun 01, 2016 06:10 am »

And then we remember that Gyatso killed when the shiola hit the fan.....

Clearly Air Nomads are willing to kill if things get that bad. I still think that no kill rue was just brought in to add in more conflict.

Aang was perfectly fine killing people at the Northern Air Temple when he knocked fire nation tanks off the mountain. Or the time he killed people in the Northern Water Tribe. As long as it didn't involve him doing it directly he was perfectly fine with killing. And those were just soldiers that didn't know any better due to the propaganda machine over a hundred years. Or the buzzard wasp and any people he killed indirectly. But the moment Aang is confronted with Ozai he peaces out and says he's opposed to killing anything? Yeah. That's like killing a cow and eating it's steak and still calling yourself a vegetarian.

He's basically a coward. It's terrible he's a twelve year old with such high responsibilities and all but he knew that going in it would happen. I would be fine if Aang did kill Ozai only if it wasn't all happy celebration afterwards. Because that would be jarring.
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« Reply #41 on: Jun 01, 2016 05:24 pm »

I'll be the first to agree that the story as presented doesn't quite make sense, given the stuff in Book Water. (Although, did he kill anyone at the NWT? We don't typically count Koizilla because Aang wasn't in control there, and the next episode directly addressed the whole issue in a satisfactory way.) My objection is to characterizing Aang's choice as selfish, since he probably saw it as pure selflessness; the story is clear enough on that point.
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« Reply #42 on: Jun 01, 2016 07:43 pm »

I'll be the first to agree that the story as presented doesn't quite make sense, given the stuff in Book Water. (Although, did he kill anyone at the NWT? We don't typically count Koizilla because Aang wasn't in control there, and the next episode directly addressed the whole issue in a satisfactory way.) My objection is to characterizing Aang's choice as selfish, since he probably saw it as pure selflessness; the story is clear enough on that point.

I actually don't think that Aang's choice at the end of Avatar: The Last Airbender is selfish, but a lot of the plot points Korra could easily frame his philosophies as selfish.
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« Reply #43 on: Jun 01, 2016 09:44 pm »

I'll be the first to agree that the story as presented doesn't quite make sense, given the stuff in Book Water. (Although, did he kill anyone at the NWT? We don't typically count Koizilla because Aang wasn't in control there, and the next episode directly addressed the whole issue in a satisfactory way.) My objection is to characterizing Aang's choice as selfish, since he probably saw it as pure selflessness; the story is clear enough on that point.

I can give the Koizilla part to the spirit, and I can give some lenience on the fact that ATLA's Book One: Water's crew was only figuring out how to execute Aang's philosophy into an action narrative. However considering the other alternative that he might be utterly ignorant in technology for the Northern Air Temple episode would have to be a stretch. Even if Aang has never came into contact with it, the situation alone would presume that someone must be piloting those machines that were scaling up the mountainside. The way Aang reacted to those machines with improvised weaponry created by Sokka would infer that Aang knew that people were inside those machines, ergo, he willingly killed people. No one forced him to enter into the water to fuse with the ocean spirit and become Koizilla.

In the finale episodes of the Northern Water Tribe, I do believe Aang killed thousands by sinking some of their ships in the North. Taking the show as a whole on face value, you can't necessarily blame his friends at looking at Aang like a hypocrite when he killed people [and animals] in the past, yet he is unwilling to kill the very man that would mass-murder what I estimate might be 60 million people[?] given the population estimates. If he had never gotten those convenient spirit powers he might have to kill Ozai, or he'll die and be as pathetic of an Avatar as Roku when he never slain Sozin and allowed the War, the extermination of the Air Nomads ,the Southern Water Tribe and the colonization of a chunk of the Earth Kingdom.

I read a Tumblr post arguing how Aang's choice was heroic and in line with Buddhism and it basically ignored all the deaths he had caused up to that point. Then again in the narrative, there are disturbing inferences that are laid out. It's fine to kill as many people as you want if they are nonbending people or an average joe since they are completely disposable. Even Sokka was treated in the same manner throughout most of the show, though its mostly by Toph. But if they are benders and you can actually look them in the eye, it is wrong to kill another gifted person just because it is wrong. But you can take their power away and make them want to kill themselves, because hey, torture and crippling people is fine if you are on the "right" side.  That's basically what energybending is, if bending is basically the essential part of life for a bender. Killing Ozai would have been the more ethical decision, discounting the group's motivations towards Aang at that point, because ending him would basically end any possibility of him being used as a puppet or even pulling off a Napoleon and taking back the Fire Nation and reigniting the war once more. It's not as if Zuko's new generals [ and the old guard] and the military complex will be loyal to him. And they aren't. By leaving Ozai alive, bending or not, Aang left chances open for potential bloodshed. Not to mention OZai can just send assassins to Aang's friends, draw Aang in and knock him off.

Ergo, selfish.

Aang wasn't a strong character to begin with, but his character was just a selfish hypocrite that preaches about life as sacred, yet willingly kills time and time again with simple soldiers and an admiral. Yangchen was right. Then again, the third season was by far the weakest of the trilogy.
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« Reply #44 on: Jun 01, 2016 10:31 pm »

I actually think that Aang taking Ozai's power away was the better choice than killing him. The Fire Nation at the end of the Hundred Year's war was in an endless cycle of violence begetting more violence. Even though Ozai had absolute victory with the conquering of  Ba Sing Se, his and Azula's solution to cement their victory was to burn the Earth Kingdom to the ground. Even with securing power I believe that the Fire Nation would have devolved into Civil War. The country knew nothing else but war, and in season 3 the Fire Nation citizens of the Homeland spent enough time insulting the Fire Nation colonists, insinuating that there was tension in a supposedly unified nation. Aang taking Ozai's bending away stops the cycle of violence, and has a much more chilling effect in a nation to steeped in its arrogance. Some Fire Benders could try to rise up again, but who would want to end up like Ozai? Having his bending taken away is the equivalent of publicly castrating Ozai, and, since his character represented everything bad about the Fire Nation, he deserved it.

The detachment and pacificm gets over whelming by the Korra's era because it seems to be the only considered path to enlightment,  even though by all accounts the other nations should have their own traditions.
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« Reply #45 on: Jun 02, 2016 03:40 am »

I think some people have their minds made up about this, and that's ok.

My opinion is, when you are put in that position of power, you get to make the decision.  And while people can question you, they can't make that decision.  So it's moot.

Aang did what many people wish Korra would have done.  He made up his own mind, and found his own answer.  Saying that he was selfish or put the world at risk, I don't care.  Maybe he was selfish.  But he got to be, because fate or whatever decreed that he be in that position of power.  And in the end, he made good on it, so I don't know why we are running him down for what could have happened. 

Maybe he decided not to kill during the show's runtime, as a tribute to the lost airbenders?  Even though Gyatso killed when necessary, their teaching of pacifism did not survive their extinction, except through Aang.  So perhaps it took on added significance for him, and all the more because it was a difficult situation.

Regardless of when he made that decision, it had meaning to him by the finale.  He risked his life for his beliefs.  Isn't that the true test?  I can say I believe anything, but put a gun to my head, and see what I truly believe. 

Beyond that, our actions have consequences.  Not just outward consequences, but internal as well.  Not killing Ozai led Aang to become more pacifistic.  Perhaps killing Ozai would have led him to see violence as more acceptable?  Would Republic City have been founded if Aang didn't believe that any problem could be solved peacefully?

Finally, I loved Toph's message in LOK that for each generation, they have their own problems to deal with.  I could blame Aang for letting Yakone live, and therefore having Amon and Tarrlok come along, but that denies their agency.  Yakone could have changed his life.  Noatak and Tarrlok could have rejected their father's hate.  And if Aang had killed Yakone, then there would have been someone else causing trouble.  Maybe Lightning Bolt Zolt would have been the big bad.

My point is, we like to believe we understand cause and effect, but the universe is too vast, and there are too many variables for us to calculate.  We can only do what we think is best.  Aang did so.  Whatever you want to say of him, he acted in good faith, and he succeeded.  Even if he failed, I wouldn't have faulted him.  So many others deserved blame before Aang. 

He was put in the place to fight on the world's behalf, which is greater than any individual, and especially a 12-13 y/o.  And when you get isolated like that, you are beyond questioning, because no one else has been through that.  When you place all of your hopes and fears on one individual, you live with their decisions.  In the end, Aang was the only one who could fight that battle, and choose how to fight it.  He willingly took that responsibility, and did it his way.  And he won.
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« Reply #46 on: Jun 02, 2016 10:14 pm »

Yeah, that's true.

------

In terms of where Aang and Katara lived as adults... personally, I'd assume that they'd be pretty nomadic, but have a couple of permanent homes around the place (one in the Southern Water Tribe, one on Air Temple island, plus probably some nice guest rooms in the FN and EK capitals). 

^ I imagine it's something like this. I'm 100% sure that Aang and Katara lived on Air Temple Island, but jumped around when duty called. Aang spent a lot of time obviously in The United Republic and Katara didn't appear distant with the Water Tribe. I don't think that the kids traveled as often as Katara and Aang did, though, because it would have mentioned at some point. The Air Acolytes most likely watched over Aang and Katara's children when they weren't at home.
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Strawberries, cherries, and an angel's kiss in spring. My summer wine is really made of all these things. Take off your silver spurs and help me pass the time,
and I will give to you summer wine.
Niko
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Bolin time!


« Reply #47 on: Jun 03, 2016 06:18 am »

Quote
Even though Ozai had absolute victory with the conquering of  Ba Sing Se, his and Azula's solution to cement their victory was to burn the Earth Kingdom to the ground. Even with securing power I believe that the Fire Nation would have devolved into Civil War. The country knew nothing else but war, and in season 3 the Fire Nation citizens of the Homeland spent enough time insulting the Fire Nation colonists, insinuating that there was tension in a supposedly unified nation.
Ozai was actually burning down unoccupied forest land, from a map point of view Ozai wouldn't even have ran into civilization except his destination, Ba Sing Se. When did the homeland Fire Nation people insult the colonials? If your referring to that FN teacher and Aang posing as Kuzon, she was just confused with his behavior and was under the impression that colonials really acted that way.


The colonies were highly developed and even had soldiers to protect them. Look how lit this place is, extremely hard to believe Ozai would just send this place into inferno even if he had the time and power with the comet. I firmly believe he was just burning down Wulong forest, the comet would've ended like immediately after be finished scorching it anyway.
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« Reply #48 on: Jun 03, 2016 09:03 am »

He was definitely going to do more than burn down uninhabited forests, which again wouldn't be a deterrent for the Earth Kingdom to stop fighting once the comet had passed.
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Niko
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Bolin time!


« Reply #49 on: Jun 03, 2016 01:31 pm »

He was definitely going to do more than burn down uninhabited forests, which again wouldn't be a deterrent for the Earth Kingdom to stop fighting once the comet had passed.
I could definitely see him burning down a small village or something. But saying that he was gonna destroy the Fire Nation colonies and cities like Omashu sounds kind of ludicrous.
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