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Author Topic: Legend of Korra Series Review  (Read 2232 times)
LunchmanJC
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« on: Dec 26, 2015 08:26 pm »

Is the Legend of Korra(TLOK) perfect? No. Is it good? Yes. You like comedy, action, romance, and drama? We got em. If you haven't seen TLOK, go watch it cause I'm about to spoil all of it.

THE GOOD :

Avatar The Last Airbender(ATLA) was a masterpiece, so there was no way TLOK could have lived up to people's expectations. In my opinion, Book 1 was possibly the best season in the series even though many say it is Book 3(mainly because of the lack of internal character development in Book 3). There are times in the series where I would argue that the Legend of Korra IS better than ATLA such as Korra's fight with Zaheer, Book 1 before the love triangles, the story of Wan, and Korra's rehabilitation in Book 4. The overall soundtrack and music is superior to ATLA's though ATLA does have some memorable songs like the Last Agni Kai and Leaves from the Vine. The animation has really improved, and the character design is on point. The comedy and action are also great, but TLOK is definetly not flawless.

THE CHARACTERS :

 If there was one thing I could point to say "This is why ATLA is great.", it's the characters. Each one is unique and incredible in their own way. If there was on thing I could point to and say "This is why TLOK is worse.", it would be the characters. For TLOK, they basically took the main characters of ATLA, reversed their personality but kept their role.

Hero of the story : Aang is peaceful and goofy; Korra is hotheaded and brash
Love interest : Katara is motherly and emotional; Mako is an indiferent jerk
Comic relief : Sokka is sarcastic and pessismistic; Bolin is childish and optimistic
Transportation : Appa is an animal; Asami is a human

Some of them start off interesting enough, but decrease in quality. Korra has great banter with Tenzin and a hillarious personality, but they go a little too far and she gets full of herself, so then the writers try to make her grow but they also go too far with that. By the end of the series, she's practically a masochist. Mako has a gangster past... which is mentioned once and never again. His entire character revolves around an annoying love triangle and he ruins every character near him at one point or another. Bolin starts off a ladies man but then has terrible luck with the ladies and gets relegated to the depths of annoying comic relief. Don't even get me started on Asami. The best characters are side characters and adults : Lin, Varrick, Tenzin, and Amon(not Noatak). There's some really terrible side characters though : Kai, Opal, Suyin, Unalaq, and Wu mainly.

THE THEMES :

Another failing of TLOK. On paper, the themes of TLOK should be amazing, but they always go too safe. Why? Because it's a kids show. If they treated the amazing theme of Equality they had in Book 1, kids everywhere would be confused. Same thing with Korra and Asami and their vacation to the Spirit World. It's not really their fault though. Blame Nickelodeon. They forced Book 2 on us when Book 1 was supposed to be a mini series. Sometimes, the series has so much exposition, I think a short movie might cover the storyline better. If they had greenlit more episodes earlier, I guarentee we would have had an amazing show. Asami could have had her whole redemption arc, Korra would have had to deal with losing her ability to bend, Mako's past would have been dealt with, and Amon wouldn't have been defeated so easily. Then we could have had the Harmonic Convergence and Red Lotus arc with the Earth Avatar

OVERALL RATING :
8/10

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I have no idea what that means
« Last Edit: Dec 26, 2015 08:41 pm by LunchmanJC » Logged
fraroc
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« Reply #1 on: Dec 27, 2015 10:58 am »

Well, I guess your assessment on the show itself is fair and there are a few points I agree with you on. The fact that the seasons are shorter definitely caused the character development to take a backseat ride. There really weren't that many "filler" episodes like The Fortuneteller, Tales Of Ba Sing Se, and The Runaway that were focused on the characters rather than the conflict. The Spirit of Competition, Original Airbenders and Rememberances are probably the closest thing that TLOK got to ATLA-style filler episodes, and even then it was only for a short while before the action got started again.

Korra's character development, out of all the main characters, is the most noticeable. She's still hotheaded and brash like Toph or how everyone views Kyoshi, but you see her become much more responsible as the series goes on. Especially Book 4 where we have a villain that is essentially the "renegade" version of herself. The choice to save Kuvira's life even after all the bad things she's done was a very powerful moment for Korra and again, really shows how much she's grown.

I never really saw Asami as the "Appa" of the group, rather I always viewed her as Suki 2.0. She essentially plays the same role. Good reliable friend, love interest of one (now two) of the main characters, a nonbender but an excellent fighter...Her problem was that she was just under-utilized.

Mako as Prince Wu's babysitter or just as Bolin's brother is definitely a much more mature and likable character than Mako with a love interest. There, we get to see who he's really like as opposed to someone who obviously has commitment issues.
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« Reply #2 on: Dec 27, 2015 01:48 pm »

I never really saw Asami as the "Appa" of the group, rather I always viewed her as Suki 2.0. She essentially plays the same role. Good reliable friend, love interest of one (now two) of the main characters, a nonbender but an excellent fighter...Her problem was that she was just under-utilized.

People call her the Appa of the group because while she has the traits you mentioned (except for maybe reliable, she did abandon Mako in Book 2 after he risked his career for her Tongue), the show doesn't usually have her display those traits, because like you said, she was underutilized. 90% of the time her character is just used to take the group from one place to another...hence the Appa comparison.

Really, there could be an mutli-page essay on why her character doesn't work.

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LunchmanJC
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« Reply #3 on: Dec 27, 2015 07:58 pm »

I never really saw Asami as the "Appa" of the group, rather I always viewed her as Suki 2.0. She essentially plays the same role. Good reliable friend, love interest of one (now two) of the main characters, a nonbender but an excellent fighter...Her problem was that she was just under-utilized.

People call her the Appa of the group because while she has the traits you mentioned (except for maybe reliable, she did abandon Mako in Book 2 after he risked his career for her Tongue), the show doesn't usually have her display those traits, because like you said, she was underutilized. 90% of the time her character is just used to take the group from one place to another...hence the Appa comparison.

Really, there could be an mutli-page essay on why her character doesn't work.


Asami is boring. Don't really need a book to explain that.
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fraroc
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« Reply #4 on: Dec 27, 2015 08:13 pm »

But to say that her character doesn't work or shouldn't exist really is reaching to the extremes. What her character needed was more examples of her value to team Avatar as an asset.
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Kairok
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« Reply #5 on: Dec 28, 2015 01:51 am »

I htink what many others needed was a compelling character arc. Zuko for example, had a reason to be in the story, interacting with the other characters. Asami, Opal, Mako and Bolin were kinda just there, without much of a motivation
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longman83
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« Reply #6 on: Dec 28, 2015 01:53 am »


THE THEMES :

Another failing of TLOK. On paper, the themes of TLOK should be amazing, but they always go too safe. Why? Because it's a kids show. If they treated the amazing theme of Equality they had in Book 1, kids everywhere would be confused. Same thing with Korra and Asami and their vacation to the Spirit World. It's not really their fault though. Blame Nickelodeon. They forced Book 2 on us when Book 1 was supposed to be a mini series. Sometimes, the series has so much exposition, I think a short movie might cover the storyline better. If they had greenlit more episodes earlier, I guarentee we would have had an amazing show. Asami could have had her whole redemption arc, Korra would have had to deal with losing her ability to bend, Mako's past would have been dealt with, and Amon wouldn't have been defeated so easily. Then we could have had the Harmonic Convergence and Red Lotus arc with the Earth Avatar


The "kids' show" paradigm is part of the problem, but there's more. ATLA was also a kids' show and still depicted the skeletal remains of a loved one in the only third episode of the series, and later on an Orwellian dystopia in the stronghold of the 'good guys' territory. I think LoK's themes suffered from neglect due to too many other competing and non-complementary needs (Quite frankly I think its almost a joke to mention equality as one of the themes of LoK, because outside the claims of a few radicals there is hardly any content to be found.) The action adventure format also proved to be a very problematic vehicle for the mature content. At best perhaps it required a rather high level of 'innovative' writing than could be reasonably expected.  Undecided


But to say that her character doesn't work or shouldn't exist really is reaching to the extremes. What her character needed was more examples of her value to team Avatar as an asset.

Asami's character doesn't work because it literally 'doesn't do the work' that is required of a fictional character. What exactly does she want? How does she go about getting it? How does her personality and her world aid or inhibit her in this quest? And how do all the above fit in the overarching story?

Without this, you have a character who seems to be doing nothing, which has been the main complaint about Asami since Book 1.  Heck, ATLA gave Appa a whole episode explaining what happened to him after his kidnapping; whereas Asami didn't even play the lead in her own storylines.
« Last Edit: Dec 28, 2015 02:09 am by longman83 » Logged
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« Reply #7 on: Dec 28, 2015 02:17 am »

But to say that her character doesn't work or shouldn't exist really is reaching to the extremes.

Not really, because her character didn't work. You yourself nearly hit the nail on the head for why that is right here:

Quote
What her character needed was more examples of her value to team Avatar as an asset.

Unfortunately the series is over so we can't judge her character on what could have been. We have to judge it on what it was...and you are right; We needed more examples of that. That is the problem. The way the series turned out, she was ultimately pointless after Book 1. I mean, let's just ask a couple of questions:

What did she add to Team Avatar?

The knee-jerk answer to this question is probably; she's the driver! Or, she's the mechanic! That's true to an extent but the series ultimately rendered those attributes of her pointless. Mako was shown to be a competent enough driver so she's not needed for that. And whenever her mechanic skills actually affected the plot (which was very little to begin with) Varrick was always around to take the spotlight from her. The best example of this is the hummingbird suits. The series told us Asami came up with the idea but we really only ever saw Varrick actually tinkering with them. So really, what did she add? Absolutely nothing. You could take her out of the series, or at best have her pop up every now and then for cameos, and the group would still have the same capabilities without her as they did with her after Book 1.

Even personality wise she didn't really add anything. She was just kinda nice. There were hints every now and then of something more but that 'more' ultimately never came.

Okay, so...what did she add to the plot?

Kneejerk reactions would again probably be her company's bankruptcy in Book 2, her getting Korra out of the desert in 310, and her dad's plot-line in Book 4. When you really look at him though all of this was pointless filler. The RC plotline in Book 2 with Varrick stealing her company and everything was really nothing more then a time waster to give the rest of the Krew something to do while Korra actually did the real plot. The plotline ultimately went nowhere. Asami's company problems are never heard of again. Everyone just kinda moves on as soon as it's over. It's so insignificant that Varrick's crimes here are just handwaved away in later seasons.

I don't think I need to go to much into what was wrong with Asami's subplot in episode 310. Her plot literally caused the main plot to go in a circle. They started in the town, got on a ship, crashed in the desert, and went back to the town...with nothing important happening anywhere in that timespace for the characters. Downright pointless. It was literally just an excuse for the writers to give Asami something to do after she had been standing around in the background doing nothing all season.

Her plotline with Hiroshi is probably the worst though. For one, it comes out of nowhere. She's just suddenly meeting him after two season never even mentioned her feelings about him. And really, this plotline was just dumb. It lasted for about a total of 5-10 minutes across the season and it really had no point. It was completely disconnected from everything else that was happening at the time. It didn't effect the plot at all. It didn't change anything. Hiroshi opening up the Colossus could easily be re-written with someone else doing it and surviving. Really, the only impact Hiroshi had on the season was his death gave Asami something to cry about so our infamous ending could happen.

And really, that's all Asami added to the series...her existence made it possible for Bryke to make a political statement at the end. Besides that, you could literally take Asami out of the series after Book 1 and absolutely nothing would change. In fact, there would actually be more screen-time open to focus on developing more important things that were undeveloped.

This post is getting rather long so I'm going to stop here but I could go on and on about her. Could she have been a good character? Of course; every character has that potential. But the series insisted on making her pointless. Nothing will change that at this point. She was completely fine during Book 1 when Bryke actually had a plan for her. The problem with her character happened when Bryke decided to keep her around and then proceeded to forcibly drag her through the series without giving any aspect of her any substance. In short, her character lacks any basic character traits like motives, desires, dynamic personality, and connection to the plot. Therefore, she doesn't work. That doesn't mean people can't like her for whatever reason but narratively, she fails.
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« Reply #8 on: Dec 28, 2015 01:33 pm »

I don't think I need to go to much into what was wrong with Asami's subplot in episode 310. Her plot literally caused the main plot to go in a circle. They started in the town, got on a ship, crashed in the desert, and went back to the town...with nothing important happening anywhere in that timespace for the characters. Downright pointless. It was literally just an excuse for the writers to give Asami something to do after she had been standing around in the background doing nothing all season.

Not only that, but if the point of the episode was to showcase Asami's friendship with Korra, it failed at that, too, because Korra had better chemistry and a fulfilling arc with the Unnamed Hook-Handed Airship Captain! Asami's sole purpose in that episode was stolen by a literally nameless one-shot character! Cheesy
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« Reply #9 on: Dec 28, 2015 02:32 pm »

Asami should have remained a Republic City only character. Everything about her during books 2 to 4 are RC based. Fixing her company should have continued into Book 3 since it was only 2 weeks later. And as stated somewhere, anything she did do in Book Three could still be accomplished by someone else. Korra had no problem with those bikers, one of the airship workers could have fixed it, Naga has shown to be capable of transporting Korra without a rider, and anyone could have taken that Red Lotus sentry. The only real change would be Korra's escape from the airship.

And then there's Book Four...
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« Reply #10 on: Dec 28, 2015 02:56 pm »

You know, that makes me think. At the risk of turning this into another Fix Asami thread, it just occurred to me that Asami could have been a metaphor for Republic City itself. The first episode started us off with the idea that RC was unbalanced and needed Korra to heal it. If you use Asami as the personification of the city, starting her off as harsh and uncharitable and unspiritual and obsessed with Probending and resentful of Benders and so on, and slowly have Korra 'balance' her throughout the whole series with RC improving in all the same ways, then that would have been the Korrasami love story that would have actually worked.

Maybe. At the very least, the Zutarians would have liked the dynamic.
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longman83
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« Reply #11 on: Dec 28, 2015 08:15 pm »

Everything in the above two posts apply to Mako and Bolin too. It points to how problematic the Krew were, and the fact that they should not have been the Krew at all. Korra should either have gone solo or tagged up with the Tenzin gang. 'Fix Asami' for me only works for Book 1 (unless perhaps it converts the Krew into Acolytes or something, and I'm not even sure how that would work  Undecided)
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« Reply #12 on: Dec 29, 2015 02:42 am »

Everything in the above two posts apply to Mako and Bolin too.

Eh, yes and no.

While I agree that the Krew was not really needed and that they were easily one of the weakest aspects of LoK: Mako and Bolin still, unlike Asami, served a purpose...except for in Book 2 where the Krew was just a complete waste of space all together.

In Book 3 Mako and Bolin's subplot with their family gave us perspective on the average citizen's life in Ba Sing Se while also leading us to the reveal that the Queen was kidnapping Airbenders. They also gave us characters to follow when Ba Sing Se turned to crap. In addition, Mako and Bolin provided us with known character for the RL to fight against instead of the RL just fighting a bunch of Red Shirts all the time.

In Book 4 they provided us perspective on both sides of the conflict. Mako with Wu, Bolin with Kuvira. If we didn't have Mako and Bolin, we would just be following a bunch of characters we don't know; ;which is usually not a good thing if you want to get the audience invested. Mako and Bolin basically provided familiarity in a plot line that was mostly featuring all new characters.

So while they aren't the best characters ever, they do serve a narrative purpose. Whether someone likes them or not is completely up to opinion...but they aren't totally pointless. Removing them would cause some drastic rewrites to the series. Book 4 especially would almost need to be completely rewritten. It's not like Asami; whose plotlines are so disconnected that they can be removed without anything else really being affected. Therefore, I can't put Mako and Bolin as the same category as her.

Again, I agree that they are relatively weak characters but they at least serve a purpose.
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longman83
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« Reply #13 on: Dec 29, 2015 08:57 am »

^Fair points, I agree with much of this. I should have added a caveat to that sentence: everything in those two posts apply to Mako and Bolin to a lesser extent. That said, given the nevertheless still contrived setup for Mako and Bolin's participation in Books 3 and 4, this statement

In addition, Mako and Bolin provided us with known character for the RL to fight against instead of the RL just fighting a bunch of Red Shirts all the time.

perhaps touches on the real reason why they got more purpose and agency than Asami did (they are BENDERS) which points to another problem with the storytelling.
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LunchmanJC
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« Reply #14 on: Dec 29, 2015 10:18 pm »

tl:dr The Krew sucks.

If I was making TLOK, Korra's parents would die(allowing the White Lotus to train and take care of Korra), Bolin and Mako would not exist, Asami would be an Equalist before redeeming herself, Amon would actually be who he says he is, and Korra wouldn't get back her bending immediately. Let's go through these quickly.

If Korra's parents die when she's a child, Korra has a reason to want to be the Avatar. She's terrified of failing and it humanizes her character. It also negates her original terrible parents who were somehow OK with locking her up in a compound. She would be more socially awkward due to her confined childhood and you could see that through her relationship with Asami.

Bolin and Mako are OK characters, but they wouldn't really do much in my version of the story. Mako wouldn't be Korra's love interest, so he would be kind of pointless. I considered leaving Bolin in, but he's pointless too. All we really lose is an introduction to the Equalists. So in my version, since Tenzin and strangely Asami(who's an Equalist *hint* *hint*) won't let her go to the pro bending finals, she sneaks in, but when the match is over, Amon attacks. He takes the bending if a probender(how we learn of his power instead of in the strangely convenient Revelation). Korra jumps in and chases after them, but they get away.

Asami being an Equalist also humanizes her in very obvious ways. This could play into the romance between her and you-know-who. She would redeem herself AFTER Korra has her bending taken away.

The last two changes are really so that the Equalists aren't defeated so easily. It could also give Korra the opportunity to actually grow and change. If you really want to make Amon strictly a villain of Korra, maybe he was the one who killed Korra's parents after having his face burned and losing his mind. The Equalists wouldn't be the only villains in Book 2 though. You could have a combination of Kuvira and Tarrlok as the villain of Book 2 : sent to restore order to Republic City and destroy the Equalists, but also return the Fire Nation colonies to the Earth Queen by conquering them. Meanwhile, Asami has to deal with her still-at-large evil dad. Korra can have an intense Dagobah-ish spiritual journey and you've got a better Book 2 than the one we actually got. Then we can have the Harmonic Convergence and Red Lotus arc with the Earth Avatar, and Fire Avatar's story can take place in SPACE.
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« Reply #15 on: Dec 30, 2015 06:14 am »

tl:dr The Krew sucks.

Well, not exactly. More like the Krew can't have the time to shine.

Korra needs the Krew even more so than Aang needed the Gaang. Aang was fairly well-rounded: he was a decent fighter, cool around people, and pretty darn spiritual - he might have needed a little help there and there, but it was nothing essential. On the other hand, Korra is a specialist: all she can do is punching stuff in the face (and she isn't even that good with this) - she needs someone for everything else: a thinker (Mako), a supporting fighter (Bolin), a skill monkey (Asami), and a spiritual guru (Jinora) are the bare minimum here. The real problem is that the show decided to sideline these roles and the problems they would have solved, effectively just handing a violent solution to Korra on a silver platter (usually with a sprinkle of Deus Ex Machina) and called it a day.
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« Reply #16 on: Dec 30, 2015 09:59 am »

tl:dr The Krew sucks.

Well, not exactly. More like the Krew can't have the time to shine.

Korra needs the Krew even more so than Aang needed the Gaang. Aang was fairly well-rounded: he was a decent fighter, cool around people, and pretty darn spiritual - he might have needed a little help there and there, but it was nothing essential. On the other hand, Korra is a specialist: all she can do is punching stuff in the face (and she isn't even that good with this) - she needs someone for everything else: a thinker (Mako), a supporting fighter (Bolin), a skill monkey (Asami), and a spiritual guru (Jinora) are the bare minimum here. The real problem is that the show decided to sideline these roles and the problems they would have solved, effectively just handing a violent solution to Korra on a silver platter (usually with a sprinkle of Deus Ex Machina) and called it a day.

I think both Lunchman and Atomaki have some good points.  Ah, the wonders of post-finale speculation.  This is what I love about fandom.  This is what I love about fanfic.  Don't let "what is" stop us from thinking about "what could be"!  Smiley

(Where Canon stops, is where I begin!  Cheesy)
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« Reply #17 on: Dec 30, 2015 11:27 am »

The Krew did have some serious potential though. Obvious one being Equalist Asami but she might have been too similar to Zuko, and we all know how people get angry when things are too similar to other thing even though it's still good(*cough*Force Awakens*cough*). Mako has his gangster past though you can't really explore that in a kids show. Any drugs at all would have made the show PG-13 at least. Since Bolin doesn't exactly have a compelling story, he could have been Korra's love interest. It's all speculation though.

After a while, the writers just lost steam. Book 4 isn't as creative with its plot as the others.

Book 1 : The Nonbenders Strike Back!
Book 2 : How the Avatar was created!
Book 3 : Return of the Airbenders!
Book 4 : Earth Empire wantz to take over the world because reasons -__- also Korra has PTSD for some reason

I think Books 3 and 4 might actually be better as movies. There's so much exposition and pointless storylines. You just cut them and the whole thing works!  Kuvira is really just there to be a problem so Korra can feel like she isn't needed. I feel like they could have come up with a more interesting conflict which I am too lazy to come up with right now lol
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« Reply #18 on: Dec 30, 2015 12:00 pm »

To me the Legend of Korra is a lot like the Star Wars Prequel Trilogy, a series with grand ideas and technique that is ultimately brought down by really bad story telling, and way to many ideas that could never be properly executed by the dreamers who created them. It is also a series that tried to be progressive, but really never should have because of the sheer toxicity of a lot of the narrative.
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« Reply #19 on: Dec 30, 2015 01:45 pm »

To me the Legend of Korra is a lot like the Star Wars Prequel Trilogy, a series with grand ideas and technique that is ultimately brought down by really bad story telling, and way to many ideas that could never be properly executed by the dreamers who created them. It is also a series that tried to be progressive, but really never should have because of the sheer toxicity of a lot of the narrative.

The prequels were just a way to have Anakin put on the Darth Vader outfit. That was its single grand idea.

And LoK could have been successfully progressive in that particular sense if it treated the characters as characters instead of props and set up the endgame way back before Endgame.
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« Reply #20 on: Dec 30, 2015 03:25 pm »

tl:dr The Krew sucks.

Well, not exactly. More like the Krew can't have the time to shine.

Korra needs the Krew even more so than Aang needed the Gaang. Aang was fairly well-rounded: he was a decent fighter, cool around people, and pretty darn spiritual - he might have needed a little help there and there, but it was nothing essential. On the other hand, Korra is a specialist: all she can do is punching stuff in the face (and she isn't even that good with this) - she needs someone for everything else: a thinker (Mako), a supporting fighter (Bolin), a skill monkey (Asami), and a spiritual guru (Jinora) are the bare minimum here. The real problem is that the show decided to sideline these roles and the problems they would have solved, effectively just handing a violent solution to Korra on a silver platter (usually with a sprinkle of Deus Ex Machina) and called it a day.

Well...

First, it's one thing for Krew members to have 'skills' Korra lacks,  its another thing for for them to meet her fundamental needs (IMHO spirituality and a mature view of the world. Jinora meets the spirituality criteria - though technically not part of the 'Krew'. While I might buy Mako's thinking skills, Korra's problems in this area would arguably be vastly improved by the sobriety and intuition that spirituality provides. The Krew in general could teach Korra streetsmart and the way of RC, but outside RC...?)

Second, it is also another another matter for Korra to reciprocate. What does she possess that the Krew members need?

Finally, there is also the need for a spirit of togetherness and sense of purpose. We all know where the Krew stand on that one.

Basically that's the difference between one group of guys who came together and stayed together out of necessity, and another group of guys who came together literally because a long time ago a bunch of kids did something similar.  Undecided

To me the Legend of Korra is a lot like the Star Wars Prequel Trilogy, a series with grand ideas and technique that is ultimately brought down by really bad story telling, and way to many ideas that could never be properly executed by the dreamers who created them. It is also a series that tried to be progressive, but really never should have because of the sheer toxicity of a lot of the narrative.

Yeah, although LoK possibly did more damage to its universe than the SW prequels did, I'll give it credit for better audiovisuals and entertainment value.

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« Reply #21 on: Dec 30, 2015 05:51 pm »

The prequels were just a way to have Anakin put on the Darth Vader outfit. That was its single grand idea.

It is still similar to Korra. Both stories started out a single grand ideas attached to important characters who are supposed to remain the focus, but both end up getting weighed down by other ideas attached to them as well as poor execution of basic narration.

Yeah, although LoK possibly did more damage to its universe than the SW prequels did, I'll give it credit for better audiovisuals and entertainment value.

I think the Last Airbender movie did most to damage to Avatar universe and franchise than LOK. LOK’s greater sin is in having way to many ideas and none of them really being properly executed or having any major impact in the end.
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luvavatar
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« Reply #22 on: Dec 30, 2015 06:51 pm »

I don't think that is true, since the Last Airbender film pretty much exists as it's own entity, whereas LOK is a continuation of the world of Avatar that was brought to life in A:TLA. To be honest I have yet to have any desire to re-watch this series in its entirety. Sure I'll watch a few clips here and there, but I have yet to do a marathon run like with all of the A:TLA episodes.
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Loopy
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« Reply #23 on: Dec 30, 2015 07:25 pm »

The prequels were just a way to have Anakin put on the Darth Vader outfit. That was its single grand idea.

Not quite true. It was also designed to showcase the stuff that had been described in the prologue of the original movie's novelization, about a Republic that became corrupt and transformed into an Empire, which is a great idea that has fueled all kinds of good stories about Ancient Rome's fall, and has a lot of modern relevance. There's also the idea established by the prequels of a Jedi Order that was too sanctimonious for its own good, an order of Paladins that fail not because they're jerks or corrupt, but because they're just too blinded by their own dogma to see that the bad guy won in the first movie and he's just been waiting two movies to kill the people who might be ticked off by it.

The Star Wars prequels could have been great political/spiritual tragedies. But because they're Star Wars, there was an unfortunate mandate in place by both the storyteller and the audience to make the movies into whiz-bang adventures.


Arguably, LoK had the same problem. It had some interesting ideas that weren't very well suited for a kiddie action cartoon. However, a lot of the better ideas centered on Korra as an action protagonist, so it's not quite the same problem as the Star Wars prequels, where the story was crammed into the wrong genre. Let's face it, the Equalist story isn't all that great in isolation, it's just X-Men again. Likewise the other seasons' issues. It was confronting Korra with them specifically that made them interesting.
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ahintoflime
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« Reply #24 on: Dec 30, 2015 08:49 pm »

I think the Last Airbender movie did most to damage to Avatar universe and franchise than LOK. LOK’s greater sin is in having way to many ideas and none of them really being properly executed or having any major impact in the end.
The movie isn't canon so it doesn't hurt the series as much as LoK hurts the series. The movie's failings didn't influence LoK as Nick ordered more episodes despite season 1's performance.

Second, it is also another another matter for Korra to reciprocate. What does she possess that the Krew members need?

At least for Mako and Bolin, she needed to jump start their lives otherwise they'd just be two more teens with super powers doing super powered things casually. She was the catalyst for them to develop. Then Asami went and helped the brothers further by being a background prop in her own subplots to bolster them.
They'd just be average Lees without Korra. And without them, Korra would be dead. So yeah Korra needs them more than they need her to exist, but they managed to become kings of the world due to Korra's desire to not do her job properly.
Also Korra's actions can tend towards people like Asami making money for their company. Unless the people pin the blame on Korra and Asami is too close then she'll also be in hot water. Contracts to rebuild/expand all the destruction Korra's decisions create, ways to protect yourself against spirits who are around because deal with it, things like this could help at least one aspect of the economy.

The prequels were just a way to have Anakin put on the Darth Vader outfit. That was its single grand idea.

Not quite true. It was also designed to showcase the stuff that had been described in the prologue of the original movie's novelization, about a Republic that became corrupt and transformed into an Empire, which is a great idea that has fueled all kinds of good stories about Ancient Rome's fall, and has a lot of modern relevance. There's also the idea established by the prequels of a Jedi Order that was too sanctimonious for its own good, an order of Paladins that fail not because they're jerks or corrupt, but because they're just too blinded by their own dogma to see that the bad guy won in the first movie and he's just been waiting two movies to kill the people who might be ticked off by it.

The Star Wars prequels could have been great political/spiritual tragedies. But because they're Star Wars, there was an unfortunate mandate in place by both the storyteller and the audience to make the movies into whiz-bang adventures.


Arguably, LoK had the same problem. It had some interesting ideas that weren't very well suited for a kiddie action cartoon. However, a lot of the better ideas centered on Korra as an action protagonist, so it's not quite the same problem as the Star Wars prequels, where the story was crammed into the wrong genre. Let's face it, the Equalist story isn't all that great in isolation, it's just X-Men again. Likewise the other seasons' issues. It was confronting Korra with them specifically that made them interesting.
Those seem more like ideas that people wanted to emerge from the stories rather than what was shown. The Jedi just come across as incompetent, and the Senate too. With LoK we see hints of something more but the focus is instead on nonsense or ultimately not pursued.

Belated Media on youtube makes a good "what if" for the prequels that shows a showcase of the stuff you mentioned. But I don't recall those things being in the prequels in any way, shape, or form.

Also the X-men...was there a story line where they are equalized to normal people? Because with Avatar those powers were originally also things to do with cultures. Equalizing in X-men comes more with death rather than LoK which had Amon taking away bending powers and instead only having normal people hate each other other reasons other than having flamethrowers built into them organically.
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