AvatarSpirit.Net
Nov 24, 2017 01:04 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
ASN Mainsite: AvatarSpirit.net
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Poll
Question: Rate This Comic:
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: [DH Comics #9] The Rift, Part 3  (Read 20248 times)
Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2920


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #50 on: Nov 25, 2014 01:54 am »

^Same.

The comics are not as great as the actual show but I really like them and am glad that they exist.  The only comic that I didn't really like was Promise Part 2 (mostly because of the Toph/Sokka storyline). All the other ones are solid with a lot of The Search and Part 3 of The Rift being really great.
Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
Red Hawk
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 879



« Reply #51 on: Nov 25, 2014 10:27 am »

^Same.

The comics are not as great as the actual show but I really like them and am glad that they exist.  The only comic that I didn't really like was Promise Part 2 (mostly because of the Toph/Sokka storyline). All the other ones are solid with a lot of The Search and Part 3 of The Rift being really great.

The Promise Part 2 was probably the weakest of the comics individually, but even then it had some great stuff (such as the moral relativism discussion between Ozai and Zuko).
Logged
Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2920


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #52 on: Nov 25, 2014 07:09 pm »

Yeah. Like I said, I really only dislike it because the Toph/Sokka plotline and that takes up like 3/4ths of the comic. The stuff with Zuko and with Aang and Katara is fine. Heck, the Kataang in Promise Part 2 is some of my favorite Kataang moments from the comics.
Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
srebak
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 198


« Reply #53 on: Dec 01, 2014 11:23 pm »

I read this comic a while back and, quite frankly, while i do find the plot interesting, we are once again given another comic where Aang was in the wrong about something.
Logged
Chinoiserie
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 132


« Reply #54 on: Dec 02, 2014 02:11 pm »

^I actually enjoyed about that. I like when hero has to change his mind about something and learn. And it is not as if Aang was completely from, the respecting the tradition was important.
Logged
Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2920


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #55 on: Dec 02, 2014 05:34 pm »

Toph and Aang were both wrong to different degrees.
Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 31458


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #56 on: Dec 03, 2014 08:01 pm »

^Same.

The comics are not as great as the actual show but I really like them and am glad that they exist.  The only comic that I didn't really like was Promise Part 2 (mostly because of the Toph/Sokka storyline). All the other ones are solid with a lot of The Search and Part 3 of The Rift being really great.

The Promise Part 2 was probably the weakest of the comics individually, but even then it had some great stuff (such as the moral relativism discussion between Ozai and Zuko).

It's weird, because I think Part 2 was the standout episode of The Promise. Its stories weren't that great, but at least they had internal consistency.
Logged

Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2920


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #57 on: Dec 05, 2014 02:54 pm »

So I guess Satoru is kind of a red herring since it turns out that he is not Lin's dad.

I wonder how quickly things fell apart between him and Toph.
Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
nightingale
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 754


This duality in me, ice and fire within.


« Reply #58 on: Dec 07, 2014 03:12 am »

Toph and Aang were both wrong to different degrees.

Is it me or they handled the whole tradition vs innovation theme a little too anvilliciously? Also on ome hamd there was Roku with the whole balance speech, but the entire story seems to pummel the idea to the readers that change is always good and must always happen. Oh my, I alomost felt they were punching my brain.

On the other hand I loved how Aang finished the battle. He saved Toph without hesitation. They have truly grown to become close friends. The hug made that the best moment in the comic for me, besides some of the Yangchen love she rightfully deserved. Most importantly I'm so glad Aang reconnected with Roku. Aang severing his connection with him was one of those "what in the world" moments of the comics. Either the writer payed attention to the criticism or they always planned to address that issue later on. Also, was I the only one reminded of Zuko's an Iroh's reunion from Sozin's Comet, when Aang and Roku met again? It's genuinely one of the best moments in the comic that is in sync with the show.
Logged

But four babies playing a game can make a playworld which licks your real world hollow... I'm on Aslan's side even if there isn't any Aslan to lead it. I'm going to live as like a Narnian as I can even if there isn't any Narnia.

-Puddleglum, The Silver Chair
HikaruIzumi
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2155



« Reply #59 on: Dec 07, 2014 05:20 am »

the entire story seems to pummel the idea to the readers that change is always good and must always happen.
The first part is questionable but change MUST always happen. That what life is about. Everything constantly changes whether for good or for worse. Fightning it will only bring a different change into existence instead of completely erasing it. I felt like the comic was trying to say that we need to fight to make the change be the better option (nations cooperating, in this case) instead of blindly fighting for what used to be because that could be destructive.
Logged

nightingale
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 754


This duality in me, ice and fire within.


« Reply #60 on: Dec 07, 2014 09:13 am »

the entire story seems to pummel the idea to the readers that change is always good and must always happen.
The first part is questionable but change MUST always happen. That what life is about. Everything constantly changes whether for good or for worse. Fightning it will only bring a different change into existence instead of completely erasing it. I felt like the comic was trying to say that we need to fight to make the change be the better option (nations cooperating, in this case) instead of blindly fighting for what used to be because that could be destructive.

Avatar also has the theme of "building your own destiny", which I would believe it also means to hold to what is true. There are universal morals and guidelines we should always strife for, even if that means to fight against change. What bothered me is that the way the author presents things, implies that trying to emulate the past is bad under any circumstance. Toph berated Aang for trying to recover the traditions of the Air Nomads (which he ended up doing in the rest of the series anyway), and the story seemed to agree with her. The comics kind of zig zagged with its themes, really.
Logged

But four babies playing a game can make a playworld which licks your real world hollow... I'm on Aslan's side even if there isn't any Aslan to lead it. I'm going to live as like a Narnian as I can even if there isn't any Narnia.

-Puddleglum, The Silver Chair
Fieryfurnace
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 143


Just passin' through


« Reply #61 on: Dec 07, 2014 12:39 pm »

the entire story seems to pummel the idea to the readers that change is always good and must always happen.
The first part is questionable but change MUST always happen. That what life is about. Everything constantly changes whether for good or for worse. Fightning it will only bring a different change into existence instead of completely erasing it. I felt like the comic was trying to say that we need to fight to make the change be the better option (nations cooperating, in this case) instead of blindly fighting for what used to be because that could be destructive.

Avatar also has the theme of "building your own destiny", which I would believe it also means to hold to what is true. There are universal morals and guidelines we should always strife for, even if that means to fight against change. What bothered me is that the way the author presents things, implies that trying to emulate the past is bad under any circumstance. Toph berated Aang for trying to recover the traditions of the Air Nomads (which he ended up doing in the rest of the series anyway), and the story seemed to agree with her. The comics kind of zig zagged with its themes, really.

The lesson i got out of it was that the past and the future don't have to be entirely separate, as they are connected by the present. I never got the notion that trying to emulate the past is bad under all circumstances: heck, the Spirit's Friendship Festival is a combination of old traditions and new ones. A combination of Yangchen's Festival and Aang's Festival. (As Aang puts it: 'same tradition, only in a different form.') It's all Air Nomad like. He's emulating the past with a new festival, and the comic frames that as a good thing. I think what the comic is trying to say is that blindly sticking to traditions just because they're old is foolish (Toph's point) but that doesn't mean that we have to discard the past entirely, because that's foolish too. (Yangchen's talk with Aang about heeding the wisdom of your past lives to prevent future mistakes, and Katara's sentiment that even though they are past lives, they can still be looked to for matters pertaining to the future support this.) It's about trying to find the balance between two extremes. (As evidenced by the Spirit Friendship Festival, a combination of old and new.)
Logged
Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2920


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #62 on: Dec 07, 2014 01:36 pm »

Most importantly I'm so glad Aang reconnected with Roku. Aang severing his connection with him was one of those "what in the world" moments of the comics. Either the writer payed attention to the criticism or they always planned to address that issue later on.

Honestly, I think this part was Gene realizing he made a mistake and he just decided to quickly fix that. Seriously, the Roku fix was so quick that it just kinda seemed thrown in. I mean, that all it took to reconnect with his past lives? Bending a fire symbol on a rock and attaching it to his necklace?

Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
Maivry
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2190


« Reply #63 on: Dec 07, 2014 04:10 pm »

I think the symbol was just that -- a symbol. Aang was ready to apologize for his drastic decision to break his connection with Roku, and I think that's what was truly needed to restore the relationship. As a comic, however, it's helpful to have some visual element to cement things, even if it has a side effect of making people think that it's all about the symbol.

Course, I could be wrong.

Anywho, I'm surprised how much I liked this volume. It started off in a bad spot, as I had trouble suspending my disbelief with the cave-in conflict and the little parade to talk one-on-one with Toph, but I like how there weren't easy solutions being handed out. Whenever someone hesitated, it felt natural. There were some nice gaang moments (Taang hug and sibling love, for instance!) and the art was lovely.
Logged

ArtFicsGraphics
nightingale
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 754


This duality in me, ice and fire within.


« Reply #64 on: Dec 07, 2014 04:39 pm »

the entire story seems to pummel the idea to the readers that change is always good and must always happen.
The first part is questionable but change MUST always happen. That what life is about. Everything constantly changes whether for good or for worse. Fightning it will only bring a different change into existence instead of completely erasing it. I felt like the comic was trying to say that we need to fight to make the change be the better option (nations cooperating, in this case) instead of blindly fighting for what used to be because that could be destructive.

Avatar also has the theme of "building your own destiny", which I would believe it also means to hold to what is true. There are universal morals and guidelines we should always strife for, even if that means to fight against change. What bothered me is that the way the author presents things, implies that trying to emulate the past is bad under any circumstance. Toph berated Aang for trying to recover the traditions of the Air Nomads (which he ended up doing in the rest of the series anyway), and the story seemed to agree with her. The comics kind of zig zagged with its themes, really.

The lesson i got out of it was that the past and the future don't have to be entirely separate, as they are connected by the present. I never got the notion that trying to emulate the past is bad under all circumstances: heck, the Spirit's Friendship Festival is a combination of old traditions and new ones. A combination of Yangchen's Festival and Aang's Festival. (As Aang puts it: 'same tradition, only in a different form.') It's all Air Nomad like. He's emulating the past with a new festival, and the comic frames that as a good thing. I think what the comic is trying to say is that blindly sticking to traditions just because they're old is foolish (Toph's point) but that doesn't mean that we have to discard the past entirely, because that's foolish too. (Yangchen's talk with Aang about heeding the wisdom of your past lives to prevent future mistakes, and Katara's sentiment that even though they are past lives, they can still be looked to for matters pertaining to the future support this.) It's about trying to find the balance between two extremes. (As evidenced by the Spirit Friendship Festival, a combination of old and new.)

I guess you have a point. Although I have to say the way it's presented feels a little contradictory. I was never fully sure the message that the autvor wanted to convey, clearly. And I did find Toph trying to fight Aqng to be the epitome of stubborness. Really girl? The giant kaiju spirit wants to kill you all, and you want to fight Aqng over the factory? It seemed a little silly, considering that a giant samurai was about to crush them all.  Tongue

I did overall enjoyed this volume, though.
« Last Edit: Dec 07, 2014 04:41 pm by nightingale » Logged

But four babies playing a game can make a playworld which licks your real world hollow... I'm on Aslan's side even if there isn't any Aslan to lead it. I'm going to live as like a Narnian as I can even if there isn't any Narnia.

-Puddleglum, The Silver Chair
Chinoiserie
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 132


« Reply #65 on: Dec 07, 2014 05:51 pm »

Most importantly I'm so glad Aang reconnected with Roku. Aang severing his connection with him was one of those "what in the world" moments of the comics. Either the writer payed attention to the criticism or they always planned to address that issue later on.

Honestly, I think this part was Gene realizing he made a mistake and he just decided to quickly fix that. Seriously, the Roku fix was so quick that it just kinda seemed thrown in. I mean, that all it took to reconnect with his past lives? Bending a fire symbol on a rock and attaching it to his necklace?



I think that Gene even could not make a decision to permanently sever Aangs connections to Roku, otherwise even Korra would have been separated from him and he shows up in end of Korra Book 1. The themes of The Promise and the Rift are pretty similar when it comes to change, in The Rift Aang just accepts the balance of past and future better, I do think this arch could have very well been planned even if it was clumsily handled when it came to Roku.
Logged
Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2920


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #66 on: Dec 07, 2014 08:18 pm »


I think that Gene even could not make a decision to permanently sever Aangs connections to Roku, otherwise even Korra would have been separated from him

He was only separated from his past lives. He still would have been able to connect to Korra. It was explained in the book.

. And I did find Toph trying to fight Aqng to be the epitome of stubborness. Really girl?


To be fair to Toph (yes, I of all people am defending Toph), she didn't know about the giant monster yet. She just knew Aang was going to destroy the factory.
Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
nightingale
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 754


This duality in me, ice and fire within.


« Reply #67 on: Dec 07, 2014 10:11 pm »


I think that Gene even could not make a decision to permanently sever Aangs connections to Roku, otherwise even Korra would have been separated from him

He was only separated from his past lives. He still would have been able to connect to Korra. It was explained in the book.

. And I did find Toph trying to fight Aqng to be the epitome of stubborness. Really girl?


To be fair to Toph (yes, I of all people am defending Toph), she didn't know about the giant monster yet. She just knew Aang was going to destroy the factory.

I actually never got that. How did these guys never noticed the giant monster coming from the sea, until the guy was a couple of feet away from them?! If the T rex makes small tremors as he walks, I doubt GOI would be so silent.

But hey, talking is a free action in comics and manga, apparently.  Roll Eyes
Logged

But four babies playing a game can make a playworld which licks your real world hollow... I'm on Aslan's side even if there isn't any Aslan to lead it. I'm going to live as like a Narnian as I can even if there isn't any Narnia.

-Puddleglum, The Silver Chair
Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2920


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #68 on: Dec 08, 2014 01:02 am »


I think that Gene even could not make a decision to permanently sever Aangs connections to Roku, otherwise even Korra would have been separated from him

He was only separated from his past lives. He still would have been able to connect to Korra. It was explained in the book.

. And I did find Toph trying to fight Aqng to be the epitome of stubborness. Really girl?


To be fair to Toph (yes, I of all people am defending Toph), she didn't know about the giant monster yet. She just knew Aang was going to destroy the factory.

I actually never got that. How did these guys never noticed the giant monster coming from the sea, until the guy was a couple of feet away from them?! If the T rex makes small tremors as he walks, I doubt GOI would be so silent.

But hey, talking is a free action in comics and manga, apparently.  Roll Eyes

I mean...Toph can't actually see stuff in the sea...right? So it kinda makes sense that she wouldn't know about it.
Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
Maivry
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2190


« Reply #69 on: Dec 08, 2014 01:31 am »

Also, being a spirit, we can't expect him to make noise like a physical being. Whatever noise he might have been making could feasibly be covered up by the rain, too.
Logged

ArtFicsGraphics
nightingale
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 754


This duality in me, ice and fire within.


« Reply #70 on: Dec 08, 2014 03:57 am »


I think that Gene even could not make a decision to permanently sever Aangs connections to Roku, otherwise even Korra would have been separated from him

He was only separated from his past lives. He still would have been able to connect to Korra. It was explained in the book.

. And I did find Toph trying to fight Aqng to be the epitome of stubborness. Really girl?


To be fair to Toph (yes, I of all people am defending Toph), she didn't know about the giant monster yet. She just knew Aang was going to destroy the factory.

I actually never got that. How did these guys never noticed the giant monster coming from the sea, until the guy was a couple of feet away from them?! If the T rex makes small tremors as he walks, I doubt GOI would be so silent.

But hey, talking is a free action in comics and manga, apparently.  Roll Eyes

I mean...Toph can't actually see stuff in the sea...right? So it kinda makes sense that she wouldn't know about it.

Still, the vibrations he made would have been an indicator. But I guess I'm overthinking now.
Logged

But four babies playing a game can make a playworld which licks your real world hollow... I'm on Aslan's side even if there isn't any Aslan to lead it. I'm going to live as like a Narnian as I can even if there isn't any Narnia.

-Puddleglum, The Silver Chair
The_Xov
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 708


« Reply #71 on: Dec 11, 2014 09:13 pm »


I think that Gene even could not make a decision to permanently sever Aangs connections to Roku, otherwise even Korra would have been separated from him

He was only separated from his past lives. He still would have been able to connect to Korra. It was explained in the book.

. And I did find Toph trying to fight Aqng to be the epitome of stubborness. Really girl?


To be fair to Toph (yes, I of all people am defending Toph), she didn't know about the giant monster yet. She just knew Aang was going to destroy the factory.

I actually never got that. How did these guys never noticed the giant monster coming from the sea, until the guy was a couple of feet away from them?! If the T rex makes small tremors as he walks, I doubt GOI would be so silent.

But hey, talking is a free action in comics and manga, apparently.  Roll Eyes

I mean...Toph can't actually see stuff in the sea...right? So it kinda makes sense that she wouldn't know about it.
Well I can understand Toph not being able to see, but she had her students with her!  They all have eyes, they're not blind!  They could've made mention of the giant armor-clad spirit dude on approach to go on a massive genocidal rampage!
Logged

iKeep: The Airbending Wipeout Obstacle Course from Original Airbenders!
That bastard formerly known as mike50333
Fieryfurnace
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 143


Just passin' through


« Reply #72 on: Dec 12, 2014 12:45 pm »


I think that Gene even could not make a decision to permanently sever Aangs connections to Roku, otherwise even Korra would have been separated from him

He was only separated from his past lives. He still would have been able to connect to Korra. It was explained in the book.

. And I did find Toph trying to fight Aqng to be the epitome of stubborness. Really girl?


To be fair to Toph (yes, I of all people am defending Toph), she didn't know about the giant monster yet. She just knew Aang was going to destroy the factory.

I actually never got that. How did these guys never noticed the giant monster coming from the sea, until the guy was a couple of feet away from them?! If the T rex makes small tremors as he walks, I doubt GOI would be so silent.

But hey, talking is a free action in comics and manga, apparently.  Roll Eyes

I mean...Toph can't actually see stuff in the sea...right? So it kinda makes sense that she wouldn't know about it.

Still, the vibrations he made would have been an indicator. But I guess I'm overthinking now.

Do spirits make vibrations?
Logged
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 31458


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #73 on: Dec 13, 2014 11:34 pm »

They must have weight, since Hei Bai could smash houses. Weight coming down on solid ground must produce vibrations of some kind, even if there's no heartbeat.
Logged

HikaruIzumi
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2155



« Reply #74 on: Dec 14, 2014 04:56 am »

They must have weight, since Hei Bai could smash houses. Weight coming down on solid ground must produce vibrations of some kind, even if there's no heartbeat.
Not necessarily. We already know that spirit world defies laws of physics and we have a lot of implications that spirits can do so too  (flight using "magic", disappearing and reappearing randomly, etc.). So it's possible that they can either manipulate their weight to a degree (they could weight nothing but "gain" weight when they want to cause damage) or it could be individual for every spirit or it depends on the spirit's power, like almost everything. But this is a topic we can infinitely argue about because the powers of spirits seems to be completely random with almost nothing in common with others and having no explanation.
Logged

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines LLC
MySQL | PHP | XHTML | CSS