AvatarSpirit.Net
Nov 12, 2019 07:33 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
ASN Mainsite: AvatarSpirit.net
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Comics and the gradual aging of characters.  (Read 6278 times)
chicken_sokka
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 467


Fire. Wang Fire.


« on: Jan 21, 2014 01:46 am »

So, considering the fact that that each trilogy takes place presumably 1-2 years apart from the last (at least according to the wiki), we should be able to see the characters gradually aging over time. I think this concept is already being played with with Aang getting slightly taller with each installment... Or is it just me?

Anyway, how would you guys feel with all of the characters following suit and visibly aging ever so slightly in each trilogy? This way we'd be able to see the gradual change between their teen selves and their adult forms from TLOK. At the rate these trilogies are being dished out and assuming each does indeed count for approximately a year's passage I think it's possible. Of course, that'd mean comics for many, many years haha.

So what do you guys think? Would you rather see the characters gradually age, or have a simple time skip?
Logged



Keeper of Sokka's Memorial Statue, Beard, and Gavel!
plushu
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 3706

157% PIANDAOIST


« Reply #1 on: Jan 21, 2014 04:13 am »

I thought The Search took place a week after the end of The Promise. Like...They went to some lecture while they were in the EK, then Zuko says something about them only being out of touch for a week when they show up at the palace.
Logged

Furudo Erika
Banned Member
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2468


King of Heroes, Gilgamesh


« Reply #2 on: Jan 21, 2014 07:34 am »

Characters definitely look a bit older in the comics. Yet they act more childish. Ironic Cheesy
Logged
Clowngoon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 1769



« Reply #3 on: Jan 21, 2014 10:05 am »

Actually they really only aged in The Promise. After that, they looked the same.

As for The Search, we're really not sure how long after it takes. The week they were out of contact could have been long after The Promise.
Logged


"Some friendships can transcend through lifetimes."

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character."
Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2971


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #4 on: Jan 21, 2014 04:30 pm »

The Search made it seem like that it started only a few weeks after the Promise ended. Think about it. At the end of the Promise Zuko asks Azula for help. Then at the start of the Search he has her talking to Ozai...why would he wait a year to do that?
Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
Clowngoon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 1769



« Reply #5 on: Jan 21, 2014 05:48 pm »

The Search made it seem like that it started only a few weeks after the Promise ended. Think about it. At the end of the Promise Zuko asks Azula for help. Then at the start of the Search he has her talking to Ozai...why would he wait a year to do that?
I'm starting to see why Sokka and Toph died so early. All this stuff they're doing during puberty is all within less than two years! Katara was lucky enough to be a waterbender which probably gave her a little boost and Zuko for having the comet and long lives running in his family. I'm not sure why we can't just get a sizable time skip of at least 6 months to a year.
Logged


"Some friendships can transcend through lifetimes."

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character."
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 32204


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #6 on: Jan 21, 2014 06:19 pm »

Why do we want a timeskip? Do we really want to put limiting mile-markers all throughout the gAang's lives before we even get a second writer in the mix? Why not leave things open for aggressive storytelling?
Logged

Clowngoon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 1769



« Reply #7 on: Jan 22, 2014 01:21 pm »

Why do we want a timeskip? Do we really want to put limiting mile-markers all throughout the gAang's lives before we even get a second writer in the mix? Why not leave things open for aggressive storytelling?
I guess it's because I want to learn a bit more about the Gaang's adult life as well. They probably had big events that time too besides the Yakone incident.
Logged


"Some friendships can transcend through lifetimes."

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character."
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 32204


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #8 on: Jan 22, 2014 07:20 pm »

Was the Yakone incident even that big? We covered it in about 10 minutes of screen time, and the only reason it was more than a curiosity (and even that was only for the weird powers of the villain) was because it had results that led into Korra's first big adventure.

If we should take anything from the Yakone incident, it's that the gAang's adult lives were fairly boring. Gather evidence, arrest the crook, fight the crook, drinks at Sokka's. Repeat ad nauseum, mix up the order as needed. Grin
Logged

Clowngoon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 1769



« Reply #9 on: Jan 22, 2014 07:49 pm »

Was the Yakone incident even that big? We covered it in about 10 minutes of screen time, and the only reason it was more than a curiosity (and even that was only for the weird powers of the villain) was because it had results that led into Korra's first big adventure.

If we should take anything from the Yakone incident, it's that the gAang's adult lives were fairly boring. Gather evidence, arrest the crook, fight the crook, drinks at Sokka's. Repeat ad nauseum, mix up the order as needed. Grin
I figured it was somewhat big since Yakone kept getting away with his (once considered impossible) Bloodbending crimes. But I'm sure there was at least one more big event that happened during the Gaang's time. It seems the big stuff only happens when they're teens and kids.
Logged


"Some friendships can transcend through lifetimes."

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character."
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 32204


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #10 on: Jan 22, 2014 07:58 pm »

I got more the sense that Toph dealt with the fallout of Yakone's crimes, but there weren't any big battles or anything. The whole big story around catching him probably looked more like an episode of Law & Order than anything else; Toph investigated at crime scenes, talked to witnesses, worked her underworld contacts, got a mental picture of how Yakone was doing what he did, and so on. She probably consulted Aang, or Aang ran into the aftermath of one of Yakone's big scores, and so he was interested in being there for the arrest. You know, typical crime procedural. In this case, the only notable element was that Yakone used Bloodbending to get away, but the only problem that proved to the gAang before the fight at the trial was just figuring out what he was doing. It was a standard crime mystery.

The big stuff should happen when the gAang was young. That was when there was a war, and then the fallout of a century-long war. That's when the world was in a mess with new nations emerging and Spirits being all upset and Zuko having to deal with rebels, and everything. Once the United Republic is civilized, the world economy stabilizes, and everyone settles into jobs in Republic City, the world has been tamed and there's little need of superheroes anymore.
Logged

Clowngoon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 1769



« Reply #11 on: Jan 22, 2014 10:09 pm »

I got more the sense that Toph dealt with the fallout of Yakone's crimes, but there weren't any big battles or anything. The whole big story around catching him probably looked more like an episode of Law & Order than anything else; Toph investigated at crime scenes, talked to witnesses, worked her underworld contacts, got a mental picture of how Yakone was doing what he did, and so on. She probably consulted Aang, or Aang ran into the aftermath of one of Yakone's big scores, and so he was interested in being there for the arrest. You know, typical crime procedural. In this case, the only notable element was that Yakone used Bloodbending to get away, but the only problem that proved to the gAang before the fight at the trial was just figuring out what he was doing. It was a standard crime mystery.

The big stuff should happen when the gAang was young. That was when there was a war, and then the fallout of a century-long war. That's when the world was in a mess with new nations emerging and Spirits being all upset and Zuko having to deal with rebels, and everything. Once the United Republic is civilized, the world economy stabilizes, and everyone settles into jobs in Republic City, the world has been tamed and there's little need of superheroes anymore.
True. Though we're still not sure when R.C was founded. My guess is a few years before Bumi was born (Assuming Bumi was born 10 years after the war.) Though it seems that Aang was about 18 or so looking at the statue. It looks older than comics Aang.
Logged


"Some friendships can transcend through lifetimes."

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character."
AtoMaki
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 5376


ENTP


« Reply #12 on: Jan 23, 2014 06:22 am »

I got more the sense that Toph dealt with the fallout of Yakone's crimes, but there weren't any big battles or anything. The whole big story around catching him probably looked more like an episode of Law & Order than anything else; Toph investigated at crime scenes, talked to witnesses, worked her underworld contacts, got a mental picture of how Yakone was doing what he did, and so on.

I look at Lin and I have a hard time imagining this. I'm pretty sure that Yakone's operations went on undisturbed and Toph even put Sokka into jail when he had tried to investigate Grin.
Logged

Keeper of Suki's firebending ancestry, the Kyoshi Warrior dojo, the love potion made from rainbows and sunsets and the mecha tanks.

My fanficions.

My Avatar RPG system.
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 32204


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #13 on: Jan 23, 2014 07:14 pm »

No, no, no. Lin is just plain incompetent. Toph was corrupt and only went after the crime figures who weren't part of her wider racket.
Logged

chicken_sokka
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 467


Fire. Wang Fire.


« Reply #14 on: Feb 08, 2014 03:23 am »

I want to see the awkward stage where Aang and Sokka are in the process of growing their beards, preferably as a competition.
Logged



Keeper of Sokka's Memorial Statue, Beard, and Gavel!
Clowngoon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 1769



« Reply #15 on: Feb 09, 2014 05:14 am »

I want to see the awkward stage where Aang and Sokka are in the process of growing their beards, preferably as a competition.
Not to mention Zuko. He'd probably shave it off when he realizes that he looks too much like Ozai.
Logged


"Some friendships can transcend through lifetimes."

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character."
D3stiny_Sm4sher
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 53


Life happens wherever you are...


« Reply #16 on: Mar 03, 2014 01:08 am »

Was the Yakone incident even that big? We covered it in about 10 minutes of screen time, and the only reason it was more than a curiosity (and even that was only for the weird powers of the villain) was because it had results that led into Korra's first big adventure.

If we should take anything from the Yakone incident, it's that the gAang's adult lives were fairly boring. Gather evidence, arrest the crook, fight the crook, drinks at Sokka's. Repeat ad nauseum, mix up the order as needed. Grin
That's all a matter of perspective. For example, if Yakone was the leader of a big criminal organization, and he managed to break OUT of prison and escape...how did that happen? Wouldn't it have negative after effects? That's an idea I've been exploring in a fanfiction -- that Yakone's organization would basically fight back against the higher ups of Republic City in order to break Yakone out of jail (which we know happened, yet don't know HOW it happened). I like the idea that Yakone's gang actually knew how to bloodbend because he taught them -- they just needed a full moon to do it, and broke him out of jail during a full moon. Which could have some really bad backlash on Toph's reputation and standing, potentially. Not to mention that at that point Lin would've been a kid, and they could've threatened the life of the Chief of Police's daughter as leverage to allow their escape from Republic City. There's all kinds of scenarios you could come up with, and they could have really interesting character development for the Gaang even as adults.

Big battles don't necessarily make for good storytelling, as Book 2 of Korra illustrated.

I mean, obviously their lives as adults would be less "exciting" than a 100 year war. But that doesn't mean they wouldn't be interesting. Seeing more political conflicts, or even interpersonal conflicts between their older selves could be interesting. Which is what The Rift looks like it will touch on a bit, even if they're not quite that old yet.

The characters in and of themselves are interesting. Seeing them interact, seeing them grow up, seeing how they adjusted to adult lives (ex. Toph being a mother?), that is very exciting to me. Way more exciting than a bunch of troops beating each other up, or some supposedly grand bending battle.

The comics have thus far travelled about a year and a half or so past the end of the war, but The Rift looks like it will have at least one "flash-forward" where we see the Gaang a few years older than they have been. I'm a huge fan of seeing the gradual aging -- between the comics, and both cartoons, we've seen them at different stages of adolescence into adulthood. Maybe Book 3/4 of Korra will show us even more. That full-circle aging process (including seeing their kids as adults) really fleshes out the world for me. It makes these characters feel more realistic and developed if they actually grew up, had jobs, had kids, lived adult lives, etc.

No telling how involved the comics will get with this. They seem specifically aimed for the younger crowd, like middle school to high school. And it's a shame that Legend of Korra has opted to back out of more mature storytelling and instead devolved into specifically-for-teens territory, but I like to think we'll still see some more young-adult-and-up kinds of things going forward, like we did in Book 1 of Korra, at least.
Logged


Author and art gallery manager of 'What I Learned at SRU' and 'Esteemed.'
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 32204


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #17 on: Mar 03, 2014 06:42 pm »

The comics have thus far travelled about a year and a half or so past the end of the war, but The Rift looks like it will have at least one "flash-forward" where we see the Gaang a few years older than they have been.

How do you figure? The Rift is beginning shortly after The Search, and that happened only a year after the cartoon's finale.
Logged

Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2971


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #18 on: Mar 03, 2014 06:46 pm »

Man, what is with this misconception about each series taking place a year apart? It seems like this comes up, and has to be explained, every other day. Where did this idea start?
Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
Loopy
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 32204


I'm Loooooooopy!


« Reply #19 on: Mar 03, 2014 06:49 pm »

I'm hoping it's not that again, and there's been hints of a time-skip during the story or something.
Logged

Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2971


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #20 on: Mar 04, 2014 02:56 am »

I don't think there needs to be hints. It seems pretty obvious that each series doesn't take place a year after the other...
Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
chicken_sokka
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 467


Fire. Wang Fire.


« Reply #21 on: Mar 04, 2014 03:07 am »

I don't think there needs to be hints. It seems pretty obvious that each series doesn't take place a year after the other...

This flawed information is coming from the Avatar Wiki. For some reason they haven't changed it and any attempts to change it get erased. Either way, my point is that I think it'd be better if each comic did take place at least a year or so apart and the gradual aging of characters was shown. I mean for god's sakes, their lives can't be an endless barrage of adventures, each one right after the other. There has to be some breathing room in-between (which the free comic book day one-offs can depict). Or am I the only one who feels this way?
Logged



Keeper of Sokka's Memorial Statue, Beard, and Gavel!
Avatar Epsilon
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2971


I can't think of anything clever to say.


« Reply #22 on: Mar 04, 2014 03:32 am »

I don't feel that way. The show itself was and endless barrage of adventures one after the other. The comics are just continuing that tradition.
Logged

"Occasionally punching a guy with an electric glove does not make Asami a strong female character." (As said by me)
HikaruIzumi
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 2155



« Reply #23 on: Mar 04, 2014 03:41 am »

This flawed information is coming from the Avatar Wiki. For some reason they haven't changed it and any attempts to change it get erased. Either way, my point is that I think it'd be better if each comic did take place at least a year or so apart and the gradual aging of characters was shown. I mean for god's sakes, their lives can't be an endless barrage of adventures, each one right after the other. There has to be some breathing room in-between (which the free comic book day one-offs can depict). Or am I the only one who feels this way?
I agree with this and I'd love to see how their life would work as they get older and how the experiences would affect their lives. Who am I kidding, I simply want to watch them grow and see more of their lives than we see now.

I don't feel that way. The show itself was and endless barrage of adventures one after the other. The comics are just continuing that tradition.
The show was a different issue. They were in the middle of a war and they practically had to run for their lives and also look for Aang's bending teachers. Now, it's peace and they don't need to hurry anywhere. I find it very unrealistic that after a year of constant running and pressure, they didn't want to just relax for at least a few months. Zuko would be better off establishing himself as the Fire Lord instead of running around looking for his mother too. I  could buy it if it was half a year after The Promise but this simply feels unrealistically rushed. As if they were trying to cramp as many adventrues into as little time as possible so we don't see them grow and change. Which is just ridiculous because comics were the ideal medium to tackle these changes.
Logged

D3stiny_Sm4sher
Never Gonna Give Yue Up

Offline Offline

Posts: 53


Life happens wherever you are...


« Reply #24 on: Mar 04, 2014 05:48 am »

I don't think there needs to be hints. It seems pretty obvious that each series doesn't take place a year after the other...

This flawed information is coming from the Avatar Wiki. For some reason they haven't changed it and any attempts to change it get erased. Either way, my point is that I think it'd be better if each comic did take place at least a year or so apart and the gradual aging of characters was shown. I mean for god's sakes, their lives can't be an endless barrage of adventures, each one right after the other. There has to be some breathing room in-between (which the free comic book day one-offs can depict). Or am I the only one who feels this way?

All of this, actually -- especially the Avatar Wiki business, which is why I originally thought the Search happened a year after The Promise (which I found out it didn't by the time I was reading it). But it also doesn't make sense if these things are IMMEDIATELY happening one after the other.

Regardless, we're getting to see the characters at different ages if only due to brief glances at the future, which is awesome.

I'm also with HikaruIzumi, it makes much less sense that their ENTIRE lives would be a piggyback of adventures. It takes away some credibility for me if there's NO down-time inbetween all of this stuff, not to mention that cities and countries don't get founded overnight. That stuff takes time, which is exactly why I think we're seeing at least that one flash-forward scene, where they physically look older than they do in the current story.

I agree with this and I'd love to see how their life would work as they get older and how the experiences would affect their lives. Who am I kidding, I simply want to watch them grow and see more of their lives than we see now.
Yea, I actually am much more interested in seeing more variety over time than this, "Oh, the war is over? Let's keep going on adventures over and over somehow." I think this is part of why I liked the Yakone trial -- it gave us a brief glance at the reality of those characters growing into adults and dealing with more mundane realities of adult life.
Logged


Author and art gallery manager of 'What I Learned at SRU' and 'Esteemed.'
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines LLC
MySQL | PHP | XHTML | CSS