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Author Topic: ASN Wants Your TLoK Episode Reviews!  (Read 14216 times)
Icy_Ashford
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« on: Apr 13, 2012 02:02 am »

This is NOT the place to discuss about the episode. If you want to discuss the episode, do it in the episode discussion board.

Just like this review request thread for the original ATLA series, we are looking for reviews for the new The Legend of Korra series.

Many members have asked how they can pitch in to help ASN. One cool way to do this and get a chance to have your unique contribution posted on the mainsite is to submit an episode review!

Here are a few guidelines to follow when making your review:

1) Submitting a review does not guarantee acceptance. If it is too short (try for more than a good-sized paragraph) or poorly written, we might not use it. Please don't submit lists of bullets either, use prose.

2) Clearly identify the episode you are reviewing and give it a grade scale rating (e.g., A, B, C+, etc.), with F being poor and A+ being unbelievably awesome.

3) Although we may edit reviews for spelling, grammar, and punctuation, please make an effort to write properly so it's less extra work for us.

4) Please don't recap the plot. You may refer to plot points or action as much as necessary to substantiate your review, but don't summarize the episode. If everyone goes over the plot in their reviews, review pages will contain a whole lot of redundant information.

5) Lastly, no hate or character flaming and please don't turn your review into an essay on shipping. If you do, your effort will likely be wasted.

6) Please don't make submissions more than 750 words or so. We never thought people would write so much, but they have! While the effort is very admirable, huge reviews, even if very well written, can turn people off from scrolling down to read other people's reviews. We'd like to shoot for reviews in the 500 - 750 word range.


So, let us know what you do and don't like about different episodes. If you need an idea for how to write, please check out some of our retired staff's reviews, notably Nat's review of The Tales of Ba Sing Se, Acastus' review of The Blind Bandit and Savitri's review of Avatar Roku: Winter Solstice Part II.

When you're done, please post your review here. We'll look at the thread about once a week (more or less) and post here to let people know whose reviews have been uploaded, and if any reviews need work before posting to the mainsite.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2012 12:30 pm by SMBH » Logged



I keep Zuko's dagger & EK coat, Iroh's wisdom, Lu Ten's grave offerings | Mako's scarf, Naga, General Iroh's army outfit, Korra's new formal outfit
GRUNT
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« Reply #1 on: Apr 22, 2012 08:07 am »

The Legend of Korra 103 – The Revelation

Let’s start at the beginning – the short newsreel-style plot recap is the perfect way to get viewers up to speed.  It took me a second to realise that it was a ‘previously on’, but once I did, I couldn’t help but be tickled at the fact that it’s presented almost as an in-world artifact.  It’s a clever touch which draws you right into this bold new world that has changed so much since last we visited it at the end of ATLA.

Although Pabu’s introduction seems inexplicable, he fits right in with the group.  One can’t help but feel an echo of the interactions which Appa and the much smaller Momo had in the original Avatar series.  Seeing Naga and Pabu share a drink together in the park surely launched a million “d’aaaw”s.  

I’m very fond of Skoochy, the streetsmart urchin.  His precociousness is just too endearing, even if he seems the sort to nick my pocketbook if I were to actually pass by him.  I’d love to see him make further appearances when situations warrant the latest word on the street.

In fact, I’d expect him to, as this series continues to show its cinematic, miniseries style of storytelling.  There are plenty of continuity links to the first two episodes, which keeps the story at a measured pace, such as a quick trip back to Air Temple island for some airbending practice (nice to see Korra acing that challenge now), and her ‘interrogation’ of the Equalist protestor that she met in the pilot episode.

But let’s talk about the action!  Amon’s henchmen, the Chi-blockers, are showcased brilliantly here.  Right from the start of the short bike-chase scene, it is clear that these fighters are well-trained to counter benders.  And when it comes down to fisticuffs, they hold their own with unnerving ability.  The Legend of Korra’s 3d scenery is put to good use here, adding that extra little bit of visceralness to a beautifully choreographed and animated fight, full of very dynamic shots.  It is my hope that the show continues to treat these henchmen with respect, and retains them as credible threats to Korra and her friends, instead of gradually relegating them to mere fodder.  Given the sophistication of the show thus far, I would not be surprised if this turns out to be the case.

Amon’s one-sided duel with Lightning Bolt Zolt presents the Equalist leader as a formidable physical threat to Korra, instead of just an ideological one.  Although Korra has yet to face him herself, we know she’ll have her work cut out for her if she cannot yet defeat even one of his Chi-blocking fighters.

Indeed, Amon is the highlight of this episode for me.  Although his “look’s like we’ll have to accelerate our plans” in the pilot episode came off just a tad cheesy, here he is legitimately frightening when he speaks to the disgruntled citizenry.  Amon’s rhetoric about having been visited by the spirits is particularly chilling – is he really just invoking the spirits to impress the crowd?  Is it a hoax?  Or is there some truth to it?  How else is he able to remove a person’s ability to bend without the usual chi-blocking moves?  These are the kinds of questions that have been raised, and instantly make Amon a more compelling villain.  Hoax or otherwise, there’s an air of mystique and more mystery to him than simply not knowing his identity.

I couldn’t help but chuckle slightly though that he one-ups Zuko by having his whole face scarred instead of just half.  Zuko gets angsty, but Amon gets even.

The Revelation may be a fast-paced episode at times, even feeling a bit rushed, such as the ease with which Korra and Mako snuck into the Equalist rally.  But the issues with pacing are minor, and I think it says a lot about how well it was put together that looking back, I was surprised at how much they fit in a little over 20 minutes. Overall, The Revelation is a model Avatar episode, seamlessly weaving exposition, lots of action, and even a pinch of romance together.  I’d rate it higher, but I need to leave a little room only because I’m sure that the best is yet to come.

My grade: A-
« Last Edit: Apr 22, 2012 08:10 am by GRUNT » Logged
rocky-road123
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« Reply #2 on: Apr 22, 2012 07:54 pm »

it was a good episode they are jumping straight into the action but i think you could already tell what amon power was i mean might just be me
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SMBH
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« Reply #3 on: Apr 22, 2012 08:12 pm »

it was a good episode they are jumping straight into the action but i think you could already tell what amon power was i mean might just be me

Please read the first post of the thread and look at the types of reviews we're looking for. GRUNT's review in the post before yours is spot-on; yours looks more like a comment about the episode, which is not the same thing. You can post your impressions about the episode in its discussion thread -- http://forums.avatarspirit.net/index.php?topic=21079.0
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« Reply #4 on: Apr 22, 2012 08:47 pm »

Avatar: The Legend of Korra  103 - "The Revelation"
Grade: A

I have to admit that after watching the first two episodes I was a bit skeptical about whether or not I would take to liking this new series.  I reserved my ultimate judgement for episode three (and probably four) to see if the most prominent sources of conflict, the Equalists and the Triple Threat Triads, would deliver for me... and deliver they surely have and then some.  Three primary points of good conflict in this episode are Bolin's and Mako's socioeconomic situation as well as a little of their life history, Amon and the Equalists' quest to eradicate bending from the face of the earth, and how parasitic the presence of the Triads is to ALL the people of the city, benders and nonbenders included.  It was said in Frank Herbert's landmark Dune series that a mentat judges how valuable the information he receives based on the questions it raises.  If I had to judge "The Revelation" by that same standard, I'd say that this was an excellent episode and definitely set LoK on the right path forward.

The very first thing we learn in this episode is that Mako and Bolin are in dire financial straits and have been on the low end of the socioeconomic ladder for quite some time.  Mako and Bolin are apparently relying on Pro-Bending to help pay the bills and put food on the table.  I like this addition because it elevates Pro-Bending above the status of being a distraction or a gimmick.  I guess now we know why Mako gets so uptight about people who don't take Pro-Bending matches seriously.  Any notion that there is some kind of "bender v. nonbender inequality" current running through LoK should be dashed by now; clearly the Triads threaten anybody they come across.  In addition, there seem to be turf wars fought between different factions of the Triads.  I could tell from the very mention of turf wars that this was going to be a big step up from the last two episodes.  This adds a nice touch that really makes LoK seem darker and edgier than it predecessor.  Personally, I thought TLA was already plenty mature, but I'd accept the mention of the turf wars as evidence that LoK is indeed "more mature" than TLA.  (Not sure it beats regular Fire Nation raids on a tiny village of less than 100 people though)

The Triads made a definite presence and established themselves as a credible threat, but the star of this episode was Amon and his Equalists.  The way Korra always stomps onto the scene bashing things sort of rubs me the wrong way for some reason; I'm hoping this is part of some planned story development to her character, though that is more of a personal gripe than a substantive flaw.  However, this actually makes Amon the perfect villain to go against Korra because judging by their respective temperaments, they are natural rivals.  Whereas Korra is brash, direct, hot-headed, and a bit simple-minded, Amon is cerebral, cunning, charismatic, and good with words.  If you think about it, Amon is a lot like Aang; he sort of shows that "approach things from multiple angles" mindset.  Indeed, going up against somebody like Amon is going to force Korra to think about more than brute force if she is to stop this guy.

I think this episode proves my initial theory that in the Avatar world, the overarching question that needs to be addressed is the role of benders in a society increasingly able to get by without the need for bending.  On the one hand there are good benders like Mako and Lin Bei Fong, and on the other hand there are bad benders like the triads.  However, this is all really a sideshow compared to the fact that tools are being developed to help muggles deal with bad benders and do work without the need for benders at all.  Note the efficacy of the Equalist foot soldiers and the tools which they employ.  There is a lot more to say on this, but I don't think I have room.  Just note what the Equalist toward the end of the fight involving Korra, Mako, and Bolin said, that "there is no place in the world for you [benders]".

The other interesting thing in this episode was Amon's... energybending, maybe?  Somehow Amon was able to eliminate the bending of the Triad boss!  Think of all the interesting questions this raises!  Obviously this implies Amon is able to energybend.  He also said that the spirits granted him the ability to take away a person's bending.  Well last time I checked, only the Avatar could communicate with spirits...  Does that mean our Avatar world has developed some sort of technology that allows them to mimic the spirit world in some way (I speculated as such over at io9)?  The turtlelion from TLA said that in order to bend another's energy your own spirit must be unbendable.  Does that mean Amon's spirit is unbendable, and if it is what drives him, what is he driving toward?  The rules governing energybending were not explained very well, does that mean you do not necessarily need to be a bender in order to bend another's energy?  All of these interesting questions make me very eager to follow this new adventure.  All and all, this episode was about 1000x better than the first two, and I have very high hopes for Avatar: The Legend of Korra.
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« Reply #5 on: Apr 23, 2012 04:28 am »

GRUNT and James Lee's reviews have now been uploaded to the mainsite.
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hallmon
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« Reply #6 on: Apr 24, 2012 12:57 am »

Avatar The Legend of Korra 103 "The Revelation"

Grade A

I was drawn into the show after the very first episode, I like how Tenzin has taken over the role of narrator during the opening of the episodes after his mother Katara. Like Grunt I also loved how The Pro-Bending Announcer did a news reel style recap of the impending conflict between Amon and Avatar Korra.

I've noticed that while The Legend of Korra is much more mature and serious than The Last Airbender series it still has plenty of goofy humor, such as Korra calling the morning evil during training, and Bolin wearing a ridiculous circus ringleader outfit in an effort to raise the necessary 30,000 Yuans in order to compete in the championships. It seems that Bolin has taken over The Class Clown role that was previously held by Sokka in The Last Airbender, Bolin who is done by  P.J. Byrne even sounded like Sokka's voice actor Jack Desena when He found out Korra was The Avatar doing Sokka's trademark high pitched whisper. Also the part where Mako and Bolin discovered that Korra was The Avatar mimicked how Katara and Sokka discovered how Aang was The Avatar. It definitely wasn't as dramatic but it was as obvious, after all Korra had to spell it out to Bolin that she was a Waterbender, an Earthbender, and a Firebender and He still didn't get it. Just as Katara and Sokka didnt get that Aang was The Avatar even though they witnessed him burst out of the iceberg while he was in The Avatar State

An irony about Amon's Quest to bring equality by ending bending is that Bolin and Mako both benders lost their parents who were probably also benders to a firebender during a mugging, just as Amon claimed during his speech. Therefore Benders dont just oppress non-benders they can oppress other benders as well, a fact that was already well established in the original series. And if Amon has his way, then He will be a Despotic Dictator just like Fire Lord Ozai and Long Feng were in the last series

If I can make some speculations about how Amon removed THE TRIPLE THREAT TRIADS bending abilities let me say that He didn't do it by Energy Bending, The Lion Turtle expressly told Aang that if you dont have a unbendable spirit when you are bending another persons Energy then you will be corrupted and destroyed. Therefore it would be too dangerous for Amon to do. I could be wrong but I believe that Amon somehow was able to completely block and lock Lightening Bolt Zolts and the other triad members Seventh Chakras which gave them access to the cosmic energy of the universe and allowed them to bend their respective elements.

Last thing Im going to say is that Lightening Bolt Zolt's voice characterization was cliched and resembled that of a typical Italian American Mafia wise guy, I do give it points though for hilarity

« Last Edit: Apr 24, 2012 01:11 am by hallmon » Logged
James Lee
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« Reply #7 on: Apr 25, 2012 11:13 pm »

So just curious, but is there are a maximum number of reviews per episode that you post on the mainsite from this thread?
« Last Edit: Apr 25, 2012 11:16 pm by James Lee » Logged
SMBH
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« Reply #8 on: Apr 26, 2012 08:56 am »

So just curious, but is there are a maximum number of reviews per episode that you post on the mainsite from this thread?

No, there is no limit. But I'm not going to upload reviews every day or every time a review gets posted. I'll check the thread once a week to leave comments for the reviews that need work and upload the ones that are good already.
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« Reply #9 on: Apr 26, 2012 10:50 am »

Welcome to Republic City review.

“The Legend of Korra,” being the sequel to “Avatar: the Last Airbender,” had big shoes to fill.  It had to become the new entry in the universe and establish whether the Avatar world could eventually become a major franchise like “Star Trek” and “Batman,” franchises that have existed for decades with countless stories in a wide variety of mediums.  I am pleased to say that “the Legend of Korra” shows major potential for many years of stories coming from this world.
The protagonist, Korra, is headstrong and blunt.  She is nothing like her predecessor, Aang.  Fans of the original series might have been worried by that, but it is not a bad thing.  In the first episode we see Korra had lived a sheltered life in the South Pole before coming to Republic City.  She embraced the new environment quickly, but showed she has room for growth.  She is a wonderful female role model for kids.
The city itself is visually stunning.  Republic City has removed the national boundaries that marked the old show to allow for a wider variety of characters to appear in one city.  It is fascinating to see how the cultures have mixed.  Even organized crime has become all inclusive.  “The Legend of Korra”  is beautifully morally gray on the issue of bender vs. non-benders.  The show does not shy away from giving non-benders good reasons to hate benders. 
After seventy years the world has advanced.  People drive cars, use megaphones, and have electricity.  There are even cameras and radios.  It’s not just Republic City that’s different.  The small glimpse of the Southern Water Tribe shows it has changed too.  It has been built back up to what it was when the War started.  The advances which could have been a turnoff to hardcore fans can actually be quite charming.
There are still connections to the old series, and they help to ground the show in the Avatar world of the original series.  The episode begins with narration similar to Katara’s in the original series.  The elements begin differently, but it’s a nice callback.  Aang and Katara had three kids, the youngest of whom, Tenzin, has three kids, with a fourth on the way.  Tenzin is an airbender, like his father, but he stands out as a character on his own and is not defined by his parentage.  Similarly Toph had a daughter, Lin, who is nothing like her mother.  These connections enhance the show, but the show does not rely on them.
   “Welcome to Republic City” does a spectacular job of reintroducing the Avatar world to us.  It may have advanced and changed, but it still feels like the same world.  The show may even surpass its predecessor.

Overall I give it an A-
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Teavana
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« Reply #10 on: Apr 29, 2012 10:00 pm »

1x04 A Voice in the Night

This episode had no King Bumi’s, no Aunt Wu’s, and no Blue Spirit’s.  Reluctant allies, kindly fortunetellers, old friends – or at least their counterpart – were nearly altogether absent apart from Tenzin, Naga and Bolin.  Once again, the show proves itself to be shaping up to not only be far more mature than I expected, but it’s also providing richer content that was only seen infrequently at best in its predecessor. 

“A Voice in the Night” explores different philosophies of power.  The most blatant is Tarrlok and his machinations concerning Korra and the task force.  His own agenda taints his seemingly noble actions, and he is quick to try to exploit the Avatar to further his power.  I can’t begin to express how impressed I was at Korra’s initial answer on joining Tarrlok’s task force.  I was not expecting her clever avoidance by means of her using her airbending training as an excuse.  However, her emotional avoidance as manifested in the dream at the beginning of the episode clues us in to her understandable hesitation in confronting the Equalists and Amon.  I am convinced she was unaware of how she bypassed the political entanglement by refusing Tarrlok.  In the end it doesn’t matter since he backed her into a corner at the gala by tossing her to the paparazzi.

Korra herself says that the authority figures of Republic City are displeased with her presence there.  In the case of Lin Beifong it’s reasonable.  She views power that isn’t earned as something that should be looked down upon.  Being the Avatar isn’t something earned or even chosen.  It just is.  Korra will have to prove her worth before Lin becomes anything close to an ally.  Other people in positions of power are probably all threatened by the Avatar’s presence in the city and therefore shun her.  In this new technological world with great councils and 17 years removed from having an Avatar meddle with affairs there is no need or want for Korra in the power structures that exist.  I can’t wait to see if this will be a topic explored further in the series.  We already have gotten the impression mystical and spiritual traditions have been quashed by the industrial culture of Republic City, so it will be interesting to see what kind of place the Avatar will have there.

Even Mako’s meeting with Hiroshi Sato offered a look at power and how someone stating out with none can gradually gather enough to be the wealthiest and most successful man around, provided someone lends a hand when needed most.  But that’s not the most interesting part of Mako’s encounter with Sato.  That part would, of course, belong to Asami.  All I can say is, thank you, show, for giving us a more compelling and complex romantic maze to travel through.

Bolin, Tenzin, and the kids in the car brought grins to my face.  These are the ones who will be lending Korra their support and helping her when she is feeling downhearted.  Naga being there to comfort Korra after her nightmare was touching, but also a little sad.  Korra’s built herself up to be so strong that a polar bear-dog is the only one she lets see her in a vulnerable state until the very end of the episode.  Bolin is tons of fun, but at the moment he lacks a sense of responsibility and depth to be more than a welcome distraction.  The kids are too delightful for words.  Just as they bring a smile to our faces they probably do the same for Korra.  And Tenzin.  Wow was I impressed by him this episode.  Why isn’t Korra calling him Sifu yet?

The confrontation on Aang Memorial Island between Amon and Korra was fittingly chilling.  Amon’s plan is clear enough in regards to power: when the Avatar has been stripped of every ounce of her power, when the people have no faith in her, when even her prowess in the bending arts can’t help her and when she feels as if the situation is hopeless, that is when he will fight and cripple her forever.  Uncle Iroh’s advice to Zuko echoes loudly and forebodingly:     
     You must never give into despair. Allow yourself to slip down that road and you
     surrender to your lowest instincts. In the darkest times, hope is something you
     give yourself. That is the meaning of inner strength.

All in all, I consider this one the best episodes yet.  New characters are introduced, relationships are deepened between the characters we already know, and the plot is furthered in an intense and ominous way.  The quality of the artwork and music remains top-notch, too.

A-       
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« Reply #11 on: Apr 30, 2012 11:33 am »

Avatar: The Legend of Korra  104 - "A Voice in the Night"
Grade: B+

They say that it takes three items in a set to establish a pattern, and so it is that I am looking especially carefully at episodes 103, 104, and 105 to see what track LoK is going to travel and whether it will be a worthy sequel to its predecessor.  After some initial skepticism watching the first two episodes, my hopes were brought much higher with the release of episode 103.  The last episode, “The Revelation”, gave us some good action-filled fighting as well as action-filled plot development and introduced us to a rather mysterious, cunning, and cerebral villain, the opposite of Korra in just about every way possible.  And so, accordingly, we see Korra in this episode coming to terms with the fact that she has a glaring weakness, the inability to think or see beyond brute force and power.  She just doesn’t “get” airbending, and it’s allowing her opponents to “dance circles” (physically and metaphorically) around her.

Right at the very beginning, you can see this weakness manifest in the stiffness of Korra’s movements.  While she generally stays in one spot with some sloppy footwork (reminiscent of her very first crack at Pro-Bending when the other team basically used her as target practice), the Equalists dance around her like the wind and manage to chi block her with relative ease.  Everything from her initial refusal of Tarrlok’s offer, to her muted responses to Bolin, to her actually wanting to practice airbending gives us the signal that Korra got the wakeup call from her encounter with Amon; bashing things and jumping in head first just isn’t going to cut it anymore, and being shaken out of her comfort zone terrifies her.  Something that I thought about during the show was how I’ve always seen the Air Nomads as a bit conservative, seemingly at odds with supposedly representing the element of “freedom”.  Seeing Korra’s breakdown made me think that perhaps they meant freedom from the trappings of emotional follies, like pride.  I mean she didn’t really think she could take a guy like Amon by herself did she?  I’ll bet she felt pretty good about busting down that chi blocking dojo, but just what did that accomplish other than padding her fragile ego?  Who did she think she was fooling with that impromptu speech in front of those reporters?  Certainly nobody on the other side of the fourth wall.  All of these behaviors are products of pride and short-term thinking, and stubbornly holding on to things like these is likely to cut our dear avatar’s time with us short.

Apart from the confrontation between Amon and Korra, this was mainly an episode of introductions and debuts.  We are introduced to two other rivals in the non-physical front: Tarrlok and the Sato family.  Between the two, I’d have to say the introduction of Tarrlok and the delegation was the more prominent.  Tarrlok is the Northern Water Tribe representative at the United Republic Council and seems like a typical greaseball politician who clearly has mastered the art of playing up on others’ emotions (he is also the youngest member on the council).  Again, Korra’s great weakness is important here because Tarrlok is able to deftly outmaneuver her as well as manipulate her into joining his task force and foolishly challenging Amon.  Tarrlok is an interesting character because his going to such lengths to take advantage of Korra calls into question his underlying motives.  Is Tarrlok using Korra – and Amon – as a stepping stone to further his political career?  Does Tarrlok, in fact, have some grudge against nonbenders?  Is he only in this delegation thing to “take home the bacon” to the Northern Water Tribe, and is he enough of a greaseball to perhaps conspire with malfeasants like the Triads to achieve his ends?  Tarrlok’s introduction is an indication that the politics of Republic City will become an important element in the development of the Avatar world.  After seeing Tarrlok’s addition to the show, it just means more good things from LoK.

As for the Satos, although not all that much is said about Asami (do these writers have a “missing mommy” fetish?  Zuko, Katara, Mako, and Asami?), obviously she is being presented as a rival to Korra for Mako’s affection (“Spirit of Competition” indeed…).  Like Amon and Tarrlok, Asami is different from Korra because she understands subtlety and has an appreciation for the finer things in life.  It is interesting to see that nonbenders like the Satos have become supremely wealthy off of the success of the “Satomobile”, despite Hiroshi coming from beginnings similar to Mako and Bolin.  I like Hiroshi Sato.  He is like the cool uncle or godfather you wish you had as a child.  Having him in the series adds another possible dimension to the Pro-Bending subplot, as the state of our politics today shows us that with moneyed contributions comes influence, corrupted interests, and donors seeking “returns on their investments”.  However, Hiroshi seems like a good guy, so I’m going to give him the benefit of the doubt.  Asami, on the other hand, might not be as generous as her father.  It will be very interesting to see if that plays out.

So I wouldn’t say 104 is quite as good as 103, but not all episodes can be action episodes.  Besides, I’ll admit that “The Revelation” is a pretty tough act to follow.  "A Voice in the Night" continues to set LoK on the right track and is a must see for those interested in following the avatar on her journey.
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« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2012 08:42 am »

Reviews by hallmon, drhorrible61, Teavana, and James Lee have been uploaded to the mainsite.
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« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2012 05:25 pm »

Avatar: The Legend of Korra  104 - "A Voice in the Night"
Grade: A-

And the plot thickens!

And it sure is thickening fast. I still love the old-movie style recap at the beginning of the episode, especially for the further 20's, action-style flavor it adds. While it is fast paced, it keeps with the style of the show. So far, I like the pacing of the show in general as well, because it provides a lot of plot time while managing to keep a good flow. Although, I hope there is time for a bit of filler here and there in the next couple episodes, in order to get to know a few of the characters better and see Mako, Korra, and Bolin develop a closer friendship.

Three major new characters are introduced in this episode: Hiroshi Sato, Asami Sato, and Tarrlok. Asami makes quite the introduction, shall we say. Hiroshi Sato's character is an example of a non-bender who is living the good life, due to his invention of the Satomobile. This raises questions to Amon's theory that non-benders are always lower class. That's something else I love about this show: no one character is always right 100% of the time, not even Korra, as shown in this episode. There are many conflicting arguments.

Tarrlok is introduced as the delegate for the Northern Water Tribe on the council of Republic City. He is the epitome of sleazy politician, and is determined to use Korra to further his task force and attempt to deal with the Equalists by force. At first Korra refuses to join, but is pressured in by the press (and Tarrlok is of course behind it) and helps do quite some damage to a chi-blocker camp, which in all likelihood will back to bite her in the future.

In this episode Korra gained more in the way of character growth than in the past three. She refuses to admit her fear of Amon; even to herself, and learns she must accept it if she is ever going to overcome it. The main theme of this episode is fear, and how to get past it. Combined with that, what I loved most was the eerie quality running through Episode Four. I was genuinely scared at a few points, such as the scenes with Amon. A particularly well-done moment of suspense is when the clock is sounding while Korra is on Aang Memorial Island waiting for Amon, and the shots switch back and forth from the clock to a shot of Republic city to Aang's statue. And the animation for this episode is still spectacular. Overall this episode has an even more mature feel to it than the first three, and in many ways is much darker than Avatar: The Last Airbender. I absolutely loved it.
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« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2012 05:49 pm »

Review For: The Revelation

One of the main reasons I liked The Last Airbender was because it was so funny. With Sokka, Aang, Toph, Zuko, and sometimes even Katara all being hilarious jokers, this show could send you laughing the whole weekend. When I watched the first two episodes of The Legend of Korra, I was shocked. It was so different from The Last Airbender. I thought I would hate it, it was so... plain. There was no serious problem going on. But Once I sat down and watched The Revelation the next Saturday, I knew I would like the series. So much tension was going, and so many questions that fans have are left unanswered. I realized this series would be hilarious when Jinora and Ikki started whispering that Korra liked Mako. I watched that clip so many times over again. If your looking for an awesome show, watch Avatar: The Legend of Korra. (only after you watch Avatar: The last Airbender)
« Last Edit: May 01, 2012 06:07 pm by 19avatar » Logged
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« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2012 10:18 pm »

Avatar: The Legend of Korra 105 - "The Spirit of Competition"
Grade: C+

“The Spirit of Competition” is an… interesting episode compared to the others.  It’s just a bit more light-hearted than what we have been introduced to thus far.  First and foremost in my opinion, this is an episode in which pro-bending takes the forefront.  Although the antics of the love triangle are what will probably stick most in peoples’ minds, pro-bending establishes itself here as an interesting subplot in its own right, introduces a new villain, and is employed as a literary vehicle through which to convey the emotional state of the central LoK trio.  Just as important, this episode was a welcome redemption of Bolin’s character and his role in the series.  The main point of contention is going to be the teen drama/love triangle thing, and unfortunately, this was more like a giant weight dragging down my grade than any meaningful contribution to the story.

On the pro-bending scene, the Fire Ferrets manage to first defeat the Rabiroos, then the Boarcupines, and then the Buzzard Wasps to make it into the finals of the pro-bending championship.  If there is anything positive to get out of this episode, it is the fact that pro-bending has not gotten stale on us, and there are few signs of it becoming so in the foreseeable future.  Moreover, not only did this episode showcase pro-bending branching off into a veritable subplot in its own merit, I found the matches quite interesting and enjoyable to watch.  There was one event which I was a bit cool toward, and that was the rather unsurprising outcome of the Ferrets’ win in the second match.  It just felt a bit too easy for my liking.  Korra isn’t exactly the brightest tool in the shed, so I have to question whether or not she knew what she was doing or just blessed with dumb luck when she conveniently lined up all three of her opponents like a line of dominoes to be knocked over.  I think I can forgive this, however, because as mentioned earlier, the matches overall were fun to watch.  Nonetheless, pro-bending has also introduced us to a new villain, Tahno, captain of the White Falls Wolfbats.  Since pro-bending has developed into its own subplot, the quality of the coming episodes is going to depend in no small part on how exciting pro-bending is to watch.  If the matches seen in “The Spirit of Competition” are any indication, it should be very interesting to see a possible face-off between the Ferrets and the Wolfbats, two teams which stand in stark contrast with one another in many different respects.  I have to admit that seeing the Wolfbats’ opponents being carried out on stretchers at the end was a bit disconcerting…  It was a nice touch and a good, effective way to show these guys mean business.

The second positive about this episode was that I saw it as a redemption of Bolin’s character and his role in the show.  One thing which had me worried in episode 104 was that Bolin’s comic relief act was getting a bit stale, and he was being relegated to “flat, periphery character” status.  Thankfully, I think we are seeing the comic relief reins slowly but surely being handed over to Jinora, Ikki, and Meelo where they belong.  Moreover, this ep featured Bolin taking charge during the tiebreaker, taking a more serious role on the pro-bending scene, and getting seriously involved with his feelings toward Korra.  Although he pussed wussed out on us when Korra ditched him to chase after Mako (remember that “glaring weakness”?), his reaction was outrageous enough to cross into “so pathetic it’s funny” territory.  I’m sure everybody had a chuckle at that moment whether they want to admit it or not.

Now the worrisome part.  It looks like the writers have gone all teen drama/love triangle on us.  My big question is this:  If they ended up as just friends at the end, why in the heck did they go through all that in the first place?!  It seems a bit obtuse to me to put your chances at the pro-bending championship in jeopardy for… what, somebody hurting your feelings?  I was left wondering whether this scenario could have been executed a bit more cleanly through multiple episodes.  As it stands now, I’m not sure I’m buying it.  The whole affair felt a bit too hamfisted, predictable, and simplistic for my liking.  As a point of reference, one of the big selling points of TLA was the relationship between Aang and Katara.  There was something about the way Aang developed his feelings for Katara in the last series that endeared me to his character and his struggles.  I think the main difference is that Aang had over three seasons worth of episodes to play this out, so the writers had plenty of wiggle room to be meticulous about how they wove that story thread.  Season 1 for LoK is only supposed to have 12 episodes?  Is that really long enough to give us a quality romantic relationship subplot?  Where was the emotional complexity we saw in 104?  In addition, we only got to see the points of view of Mako, Korra, and Bolin, and this calls into question where (or even “if”) Asami will fit into all this.

So judging by 103, 104, and 105 I feel confident that LoK can and probably will stand as a worthy successor to TLA.  There is definite potential for interesting romantic tension to be woven in this series.  However, if it follows after what we see in "The Spirit of Competition", I think I'm just going to tune the whole mess out in favor of watching the other interesting things this show has to offer (Amon, pro-bending, Triads, etc).
« Last Edit: May 16, 2012 03:25 am by SMBH » Logged
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« Reply #16 on: May 12, 2012 06:02 pm »

The Legend of Korra 105 - "The Spirit Of Competion"
Grace: B-

 "The Spirit of Competition" is an epiosde entirely different from our other past episodes. While the others deal with alot of action and the revolution plot around Amon. This one is total "Fanservice" to LoK shippers. It's more of a breather if you will. There's nothing wrong with having a fun filler (which it is). But was the episode too much? And was it just to get us all hyped about the love triangle between our new Gaang? Well I will be giving you my rundown on the epiosde and what it brings.

 The episode brings alot of tension between our new and older Gaang. Mike and Bryan were'nt lying about the serious being more mature. Dealing with hormones and love made this episode realistic in many ways. In this episode we are officiallly introduced to love triangle. We already knew Korra had the hots for Mako but we also see Bolin is in it for Korra. Leaving Mako to be the one confused on choosing who's better. Korra or Asami. Just making it even more frustrating playing in the pro bending games with each other. It's good to know we officially have a "real" love triangle than we had with Kataang and Zutara in TLA. But it felt like it was too early to make that idea unleash on the 5th episode. Also to leave more time to develop the team as best buds more than pro bending buddies in later episodes.

 Later on in the epiosde we get to meet a new character named Tahno a waterbender. Though he seems to be kinda creepy at times I think I'm going to like his character. He seems to be a good foil to Korra. Giving someone who rubs her the wrong way makes the show even more joyable. Besides the voice actor of Tenzin, Tahno's voice is one of the best voices in the series as of right now. Tahno and his team the "Wolfbats" remind me of "Prince and the Revolution". Tahno has Prince's style and everything in my eyes. Him saying to Korra "I can give you some private lessons" was very funny and alittle sexual for kiddies.

 Bolin in this episode gave me alot of mixed reactions. Seeing him trying to win the girl made you want to root for Borra all  the way. Even if you were a hardcore Makorra fan. But as the episode later went on you just want to turn away. The kiss between Mako and Korra is what I'm talking about. You would think the writers would make the scene with Bolin standing watching his own brother kiss the girl of his dreams would spark some drama. But it later turned into something comical with Bolin crying and running off like a little kid. Even though he is the comic relief of the sereis Bolin isn't that much of a serious character yet. This shows us that he is infect the Anti-Sokka. Even though Sokka was the original funny man in TLA, he had a serious side to his character than just being the comedian.

 The drama and tension comes to to a close when the team has to put their feelings aside and win their Pro Bending match. Korra makes it up to Bolin and Mako and Korra try to just be friends (as for right now). Seeing Korra thanking Asami for all her and her father has done for the Ferrets was good. But not good enough especially Asami had no character develpment in this episode at all. Meaning either she's just there to be the foil for Makorra from happening. Or Mike and Bryan are cooking up something for Asami and won't tell us until in future episodes. At the end Tahno and his team go up next and murder ther match in ony in a short amount of time. Showing the Wolfbats are good competition to the Fire Ferrets and from stopping them from winning anything anymore.

 In other words it was a fun episode to enjoy. And if your a big time shipper then this episode will go down in your all time favorites. In the episode we got to learn more about the characters and how future episodes will continue their emotions for one another. Though "The Legend of Korra" promises alot more instrore than just shipping.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2012 06:06 pm by horizioncat120 » Logged



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« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2012 09:10 pm »

Okay, Imma try to make an review without getting bored XD

The Legend of Korra 101: "Welcome to Republic City"

Grade: A

This is the episode that starts off a brand new story of adventure and growth. As a very big fan of the original Avatar: The Last Airbender series, I was a little worried about the success of this new spinoff series creators Mike DiMartino and Bryan Konietzko have developed over the past few years, since sequels rarely live up to their predecessors, as far as I knew. However I was also confident that, since most of the original team behind the show as returned, the new series might have me pleastly surprised. And I was.

We start off with the new intro. It was very similar to the original series' intro, only the background was blue and all the benders of the elements were past avatars, and the current avatar, Korra. I thought this was a very nice touch because it brought me home to the Avatar series I knew and loved instead of shoving me something brand new in the face. Next, we have Aang's son, Tenzin, narrating the intro and telling us what has happend since the end of the last series. Although he doesn't tell us a whole lot, he does tell us some important information and background on Republic City, where the main setting of the series is. I thought this was helpful during the intro so they won't have to spend time during the actual show explaining how Republic City came about. And then we get a glipse of the glorious Aang statue, which tells us that Aang is no longer here and the story is about the next avatar, as Tenzin also explains.

Then, the actual episode. It starts off with three people with a small burning lamp in the middle of a blizzard. Then they come up to an igloo to find a man calling them, "The White Lotus." He opens the door and we see a woman, trying to clean up the place to make it look nice for the guests. And then something on the wall falls off. I snickered at that. I was also worried that there was not going to be much comedy in this new series, but as soon as I saw little Korra bursting through the wall shouting, "I'm the Avatar, you gotta deal with it!" My worries slipped away. What really surprised me though is how she could bend 3 of the 4 elements already at only 4 years old! They were only little bursts of them, but still, it was quite impressive for a little girl.

After that we see Korra as a 17 year old young woman, having her fire-bending exam. I loved the music at this part, because it was similar music to the original series, but it had a new twist on it as well. As soon as the exam is done, Korra immediately wants to move on and start her airbending training. This shows how eager Korra is and her impatience as well. She reminds me of Aang in that way, but I could also tell she was going to be completely different from him, too. When they introduced Katara I was in big shock. Especially since she was so old and I was so used to her being young. But it's 70 years after the war, so it makes perfect sense.

It turns out Korra is being locked in a compound in the South Pole so she could train in safety. And and she doesn't like that. Who would? And it also turned out it was Aang's idea before he passed away and Korra was born, so that the avatar is kept safe and secret while he/she trains. I'm guessing Aang didn't want Korra to go through what he went though at a young age, when as soon as Aang was told he was the avatar, they needed him to save the world when he wasn't even close to ready. In Korra's case, she wanted to save the world NOW and didn't want to be locked up any longer, which is why she wants to get her training done as fast as possible so she could leave. This situation, while not too relateable, is very realistic because you could feel the emotion she was feeling and you end up feeling sorry for her, which is really good characterization.

Tenzin arrives with his wife, Pema, and three kids, Jinora, Ikki, and Meelo. The kids are adorable and hilarious to watch. Pema is hilarious too, especially because I didn't think she'd act the way that she did, but I'm glad my expectations for her were wrong, because it made me enjoy her. Tenzin is very serious as Katara put, and you could tell a person like Korra was going to be a bit stressful to train for him. But Tenzin tells Korra that he couldn't train her right now because he's needed at Republic City as the representative of the Air Nomads, and of course Korra is upset by that. So upset, that she ends up running away to Republic City to find Tenzin so she could train with him there. This is the first time ever Korra is leaving home, so when she eventually arrives in Rebublic City, things get a little chaotic.

First of all, she didn't have the money to get any food, so she went fishing in the park and burned a few there. While eating, she meets Gommu, a hobo who lives in the bush next to her. He explains there are a lot of people in Republic City who are homeless and poor. Korra was surprised by that, since everything she heard about the City was so wonderful and everyone was happy. Of course, they do this scene in a comedic fashion, which is a very nice touch, since I am always a sucker for comedy, and I don't want the small children, and me, getting ideas that this series was going to be sad and horrific.

Next, we get a glimpse at the revolution and rivalry that's about to start in Republic City, which is between the benders and non-benders of the city. There's a protester shouting out that non-benders are living worse lives because they don't have the advantage to bend, which makes perfect sense. He also says that benders need to be taught a lesson and their establish ment should be geared down. But Korra storms in and yells at the protester, saying that bending is, "The coolest thing in the world" in her words. This was exactly what the protester needed to prove his point. Benders are brutes and bullies who only use their power to be above others, according to him.

The real action gets down when Korra meets some criminals of Republic City, called the Triple Threat triad. Some members of the Triad threaten to destroy a shop if the shopkeeper did not give them the money. Korra interrupts their conversation and they get into a fight, which Korra wins by knocking their car into another building when the Triad people were trying to escape in it. We get introduced to the police soon after this and Korra gets arrested, after a very awesome chase scene. Korra doesn't understand why she's arrested because she believes she helped the city by catching the bad guys. We then meet the Cheif of Police, Lin Bei Fong, who is Toph Bei Fong's daughter. She obviously does not like Korra, especially after the damage she caused. But I knew that Lin was not going to be an antagonist in this series, since they both want justice in this city.

Tenzin arrives at the Police Station to pick up Korra and he tells her that she can't stay in the city and has to return to the South Pole. Korra argues that the City needs her and this problem can't wait any longer for her to finish her training back home. However Tenzin does not change his mind. I also feel bad for Korra here, because we've seen what Korra has seen and they City does have its share of problems. But on the other hand, I knew that Korra didn't solve any of those problems right away and wasn't too sure about any of it either. She clearly was not ready for a problem this big. When the White Lotus people arrive to take her back, Tenzin's kids fly in on their gliders and ask if Korra was going to stay with them. When she replied no, you could feel the sadness in the kids' and even Tenzin's heart too. This is the part where he changes his mind and allows Korra to train on his home, Air Temple Island. Korra is ecstatic about that.

The next day, Korra is being introduced to the pubic via radio and a huge crowd of people by City Hall, where Korra is standing at a podium with microphones. I was surprised by the amount of advancement the Avatar World has gotten too since the war ended. And I thought I would never get used to it, but it turns out it didn't bother me as much. This is a new time period, location, and series, after all. The last scene of the episode is where two people are listening to the radio in a small room. One man turns it off and asks the other man how he wants to handle this situation. I knew these two men were the antagonists of the series. And the main antagonist, named Amon, was standing in front of a map of the city, saying he'll have to accelerate his plans. He is shown with a mask on his face. His voice really creeped me out when I watched it.

If I had to say anything I didn't like about this episode, I guess it would be the pacing. It wasn't off, but everything was happening so fast. And I wanted to get more in depth with the South Pole scenes. But I knew since this season is only 12 episodes, that everything was going to go fast. So I'll cut them a little slack for that. Overall I enjoyed the episode very much and I was really happy to see the World of Avatar expanding.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2012 09:12 pm by Avapony » Logged

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« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2012 03:20 pm »

1x02 A Leaf in the Wind

Part two of the Korra premiere cements Korra's bond with her Airbending master, Tenzin, and establishes her place in the world of pro-bending alongside the Fire Ferret brothers, Mako and Bolin.  Mostly, this episode is full of character development and introductions, coupled with comedy, less action, and some very nice moments of ab-so-lute-ly beautiful artwork and music. 

Following the end of "Welcome to Republic City," this episode begins with Korra's wish to see a pro-bending match with Tenzin, yet he dismisses pro-bending as "drivel" and wants for Korra to stay put and focus on airbending.  This difference becomes the source of conflict of the episode as Korra's focus is increasingly on pro-bending the more she fails to do well at airbending practices. From reading about pro-bending in the paper, to staying up late to listen to matches on the radio, to sneaking away at night to go to the arena, and to volunteering herself to play on a team, Korra resolutely sends the message that she needs an outlet from the stress of being bad at airbending.       

The Airbending gates scene is full of comedy, but this one scene really fleshes out Korra's character in her approach to the lesson.  Headstrong and straightforward Korra is no match for the evasiveness and non-confrontational attitude needed to traverse the gates.  Likewise, mediation proves to be a difficult task for Korra.  Besides highlighting the differences between student and teacher these scenes are helped along by Tenzin's kids providing loads of humor.

I've got to take a moment to say seeing Korra sneak out at night and leap off a cliff while waterbending a smooth landing has got to be the defining moment where her kick-ass character status was engraved in my mind.  I must also say the artwork of Air Temple Island and Republic City at night deserve to be framed and hung on walls.   

The introduction of the Fire Ferret brothers to Korra was a delight.  One friendly and flirty and the other full of false assumptions and reserve.  Both brothers are charming in their own unique way, but it's clear that Bolin will start out as the fan favorite and comedy guy while Mako is left with the task of being exposition and plot driving guy.  Pro-bending is a creative spin on MMA and the 1920's boxing fervor even if it feels a tad gimmicky, but it's main function here is to help Korra befriend Bolin and Mako and to give her a newer perspective on the bending arts. 

"A Leaf in the Wind" bookends wonderfully when Tenzin and Korra do find themselves at a pro-bending match together, except Korra is a participant and not a spectator and Tenzin, while initially there to discipline her, ends up cheering her on after he's barraged with her grievances towards airbending.  Overall, a solid episode that that brings in new characters and further develops the people and places Korra will be involved with in Republic City.   

The artwork and music continue to wow and greatly impress.  The voice acting is top-notch, also.

A-   
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Why, yes, that quote is from The Sandlot.  It just fits the Avatar Universe so well.
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« Reply #19 on: May 16, 2012 03:46 am »

Reviews added:
   - Mslotrfanatic
   - James Lee (edited to change a word)
   - horizioncat120 (I had to fix several spelling mistakes, so please use spellcheck next time)
   - Teavana


Reviews not added yet because they need work:
   - 19avatar (you're not really reviewing the episode there, plus you didn't include a grade rating)
   - Avapony (your review is toooooo loooooong; rewrite it to make it shorter in a new post in this thread and then I'll upload it)
« Last Edit: May 16, 2012 03:49 am by SMBH » Logged


ATLA Keeps: Kuei's necklace, Pandalilies, Zhaodburns, Sokka's DoBS speech
TLOK Keeps: Sparkly bush, Aang's statue, Korrlok, Asami's racetrack
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« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2012 02:34 pm »

^ Okay, sorry haha. I didn't think I'd be writing that much. I'll fix it. Hold on.

EDIT: If it's still too long I can take out more.

EDIT 2: Took out the parts that were mostly summaries. And added one or two more of my own thoughts. Wink

The Legend of Korra 101: "Welcome to Republic City"

Grade: A

This starter to a brand new series begins with three people with a small burning lamp in the middle of a blizzard. Then they come up to an igloo to find a man calling them, "The White Lotus." He opens the door and we see a woman, trying to clean up the place to make it look nice for the guests. And then something on the wall falls off. I snickered at that. I was also worried that there was not going to be much comedy in this new series, but as soon as I saw little Korra bursting through the wall shouting, "I'm the Avatar, you gotta deal with it!" My worries slipped away. What really surprised me though is how she could bend 3 of the 4 elements already at only 4 years old! They were only little bursts of them, but still, it was quite impressive for a little girl.

After that we see Korra as a 17 year old young woman, having her fire-bending exam. I loved the music at this part, because it was similar music to the original series, but it had a new twist on it as well. As soon as the exam is done, Korra immediately wants to move on and start her airbending training. This shows how eager Korra is and her impatience as well. She reminds me of Aang in that way, but I could also tell she was going to be completely different from him, too. When they introduced Katara I was in big shock. Especially since she was so old and I was so used to her being young. But it's 70 years after the war, so it makes perfect sense.

Tenzin arrives with his wife, Pema, and three kids, Jinora, Ikki, and Meelo. The kids are adorable and hilarious to watch. Pema is hilarious too, especially because I didn't think she'd act the way that she did, but I'm glad my expectations for her were wrong, because it made me enjoy her. Tenzin is very serious as Katara put, and you could tell a person like Korra was going to be a bit stressful to train for him. But Tenzin tells Korra that he couldn't train her right now because he's needed at Republic City as the representative of the Air Nomads, and of course Korra is upset by that. So upset, that she ends up running away to Republic City to find Tenzin so she could train with him there. This is the first time ever Korra is leaving home, so when she eventually arrives in Rebublic City, things get a little chaotic.

First of all, she didn't have the money to get any food, so she went fishing in the park and burned a few there. While eating, she meets Gommu, a hobo who lives in the bush next to her. He explains there are a lot of people in Republic City who are homeless and poor. Korra was surprised by that, since everything she heard about the City was so wonderful and everyone was happy. Of course, they do this scene in a comedic fashion, which is a very nice touch, since I am always a sucker for comedy, and I don't want the small children, and me, getting ideas that this series was going to be sad and horrific.

After all the events Korra has witnesssed, including getting arrested, Tenzin arrives at the Police Station to pick up Korra and he tells her that she can't stay in the city and has to return to the South Pole. Korra argues that the City needs her and this problem can't wait any longer for her to finish her training back home. However Tenzin does not change his mind. I also feel bad for Korra here, because we've seen what Korra has seen and they City does have its share of problems. But on the other hand, I knew that Korra didn't solve any of those problems right away she clearly was not ready for an issue this big. When the White Lotus people arrive to take her back, Tenzin's kids fly in on their gliders and ask if Korra was going to stay with them. When she replied no, you could feel the sadness in the kids' and even Tenzin's heart too. This is the part where he changes his mind and allows Korra to train on his home, Air Temple Island. Korra is ecstatic about that, and so was I, even though that scene was completely predictable for me.

The next day, Korra is being introduced to the pubic via radio and a huge crowd of people by City Hall, where Korra is standing at a podium with microphones. I was surprised by the amount of advancement the Avatar World has gotten too since the war ended. And I thought I would never get used to it, but it turns out it didn't bother me as much. The last scene of the episode is where two people are listening to the radio in a small room. One man turns it off and asks the other man how he wants to handle this situation. I knew these two men were the antagonists of the series. And the main antagonist, named Amon, was standing in front of a map of the city, saying he'll have to accelerate his plans. He is shown with a mask on his face. His voice really creeped me out when I watched it.

If I had to say anything I didn't like about this episode, I guess it would be the pacing. It wasn't off, but everything was happening so fast. And I wanted to get more in depth with the South Pole scenes. But I knew since this season is only 12 episodes, that everything was going to go fast. So I'll cut them a little slack for that. Overall I enjoyed the episode very much and I was really happy to see the World of Avatar expanding.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2012 11:13 pm by Avapony » Logged

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« Reply #21 on: May 24, 2012 10:02 pm »

Added Avapony's revised review.
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ATLA Keeps: Kuei's necklace, Pandalilies, Zhaodburns, Sokka's DoBS speech
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« Reply #22 on: Jun 10, 2012 12:57 am »

The Legend of Korra: 109: Out of the Past
As the episode title implies this segment of the Korra saga looks back on a sequence of events that took place early on in Republic City’s history and directly influence Korra’s current situation. The flashbacks of early Republic City included Aang, Sokka, and Toph from the original, series as they worked within the governance of the city. Their reappearance was refreshing to me, and though I liked the older versions of Sokka and Toph much better than that of Aang it was great to see the old team again fighting crime.
The problems I had with this episode included a number of story progression hiccups, but that on the larger scope of things won’t matter all that much. Asami’s excessive concern over Mako’s romantic interests in Korra, and Mako’s sudden outburst of feelings for the missing Korra I think beyond being a bit cheesy make it obvious that Asami is, in all likelihood, going to get dumped in a future episode. The search party sequences of the episode I also noticed were at times a bit jumpy and a bit outside the realm of likelihood – the chance finding of equalist tunnels, almost obviously in plain sight, and convenient escape to name a few.
Though there were a number of flaws in the animation, within the whole scope of the episode, which was on the whole masterfully and beautifully animated and framed, they can be more or less overlooked. The one concern I hold however is that in creating a separate series the animation of the Avatar world doesn’t lose its vibrant colors, seeing as this episode used even more excessively pale grey-brown colors. Adventure filled and action packed, the fight sequences, though quite epic already, I feel could have been carried out with a bit more poise and clarity to capitalize on how amazing bending can truly be.
      The major problems that I had with the episode however deal with the rules of the Avatar world regarding special abilities, and how those rules (the explanations for and limitations to abilities) directly affect the flow of the story. The 3 flash back sequences from the previous 3 episodes are combined and extended in this episode – finally giving a clear explanation of what happened way back when, but surprisingly only making for more questions. What Explanations in this episode and even in the flashbacks are revealed only lead to more confusion and questions, specifically centering around bloodbending. I hope the mystery of Tarrlok and Yakone’s form of bloodbending is not overlooked in future episodes, which would be a major oversight. So far Blood bending, without the full moon, with extreme power, in extreme scope, has been accredited (by Sokka) as simply enough another bizarre bending ability, or seeming impossibility, such as “spontaneous combustion” or metalbending. Korra attributed Tarrlok’s ability to nothing more than the fact that he was Yakone’s son – implying hereditary ability. While the mysteries of combustion man's abilities were similarly never addressed, in the same sense neither were his powers of such scope as this new form of bloodbending - or Amon's abilities for that matter, and neither were they of such intricate influence to the plot.

Amon’s abilities in this episode were again a center of mystery, making me questions their origins in bloodbending to extreme scope like Tarrlok, energybending , or if his abilities should be attributed to something else entirely. How it was that he was only barely bloodbent as Tarrlok defended himself only adds to the mystery of his abilities. His powers require a logical explanation.
In the same sense I was disappointed with the sprit connection and Avatar state’s depiction in this show. I was pleased that Korra was able to connect with Aang’s past memory, but that connection was minimal and uninformative compared to the connections Aang made with Roku. It seem Korra’s spirit connections will are unique. Aang’s use of both the Avatar state and energy bending in the flashback lacked the depiction and emphasis I believe they deserved.
Because of the continued, and nearly suspense-less, lack of explanations regarding these mysterious abilities, abilities which are such a vital part of the whole story’s scope I’m going to give this episode a certified B- rating. They kept me watching, they kept me entertained, I really liked the animation, I loved the appearances of the original characters in a new setting, and the adventure Korra and her friends took, but without feeling suspense over these huge burning questions that have arisen mystery’s rubbing me the wrong way.
Pollux
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SMBH
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« Reply #23 on: Jun 10, 2012 01:11 am »

^ Review uploaded.
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ATLA Keeps: Kuei's necklace, Pandalilies, Zhaodburns, Sokka's DoBS speech
TLOK Keeps: Sparkly bush, Aang's statue, Korrlok, Asami's racetrack
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« Reply #24 on: Jun 23, 2012 07:36 pm »

Episode 10 "Turning the Tides" Review

Grade B+

This weeks episode had a great start. Started out with a little Makorra action, which can make a lot of us fans happy-sorry Masami fans-. Then we get a short recap from korra of what happened last episode, which was fine, a lot did happen. Then we see Tenzin asking Lin to babysit before he goes to work, which was cute with the Linzin factor and Meelo always gives me a reason to laugh. But once Tenzin left, I felt that things were just going way too fast.

First of all, now along with the equalists having the the lightning gloves, they also can desguise them as other equipment? When were those created? Then the equalist airships which we have seen before, well, we saw 1 airship. Now the 50 or so they seem to have now. All of the fighting happens, and the events that happened at the police station just seem like their impossible. I'm guessing that the police station's air ducts are metal, so how did metalbending cops and other personel not hear equalists climbing through them to plant the gas bombs? Ever try climbing through those? they make ALOT of noise! Unless your an airbender or weigh nothing it's going to be apparent someones in there!

Of course then in the midst of the battle Mike and Bryan do what everyone would suspect right before equalists reach air temple island... THE BABIES COMING! Man how many times has that freakin' happened. Sad thing was, me being a Linzin fan, I was hoping Pema wasn't going to make it at first, but I didn't really mean it.

Then there's the actual battle of airtemple island, in which Lin gets her butt kicked... again, but is saved... again, by the airbender kids. Which I thought was totally awesome! They were fighting for their home like anyone would have done. But of course, no one wins against Amon so they go to leave.

This last part, made me really sad. So the airship is catching up to the bison, and Lin wants to keep the others safe, so she wants to take it down. So she jumps onto the airship!?!! Didn't your mom's stories about what happened when she did that teach you anything Lin?! You are wearing a suit of metal that you could destroy the engines with but instead you rip it apart and get captured. Granted, she did what her mother would have done, not telling Amon where Korra was, but her loosing her bending was like a knife in the heart for me.

Then of course we get the scene with the new character "General Iroh", which I guess is supposed to make up for the stuff that just happened. Yes, lets send in MORE benders into Republic City to loose their bending. THATS BRILLANT!..... idiots... Guess he's related to Zuko somehow... though if he were the new Firelord's son, I don't think it would be smart of him to go into battle when he's the heir to the throne! Look what happened when Iroh Sr. Did!
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